outpouring of support

< Previous | Next >

Milad333

Senior Member
Armenian
Hello
I can not understand these sentences (especially the colored ones)
would you please help me to do that?

"In explaining the outpouring of support, the National Alliance Against Racism and Political Repression compared Attica to “certain other villages and hamlets” that had “come to represent for peoples of conscience the world over a name imbedded in history for its savagery and intolerable shame."
(Blood in the Water by Heather Ann Thompson)
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The full quote is shown here (Google Books, no quoting possible): Blood in the Water

    It appears that some people considered the grouping of murderers and rapists and thugs in the prison were a society badly maligned by the way that the uprising was put down.

    I recall the events and I never considered the Attica inmates a "village or hamlet". They were prisoners unhappy with the way they were being kept. (Some of their complaints were quite valid, and Rockefeller's reaction is rightly to be condemned). But a "village" they were not.
     

    Milad333

    Senior Member
    Armenian
    I just have some problems with the semantics of these sentences, this is my understanding of this text ;

    "the organization believes that Attica was just like those cities which their names represent their brutality against Conscientious people in history."

    Is that right?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I just have some problems with the semantics of these sentences, this is my understanding of this text ;

    "the organization believes that Attica was just like those cities which their names represent their brutality against Conscientious people in history."

    Is that right?
    Yes, she considered Attica a vile place. But keep in mind prior to the uprising in the prison Attica was not a name on the tips of peoples' tongues. It was a largely invisible institution.

    The reputation for brutality grew after the uprising, but before. In that sense the prison riot did effect change--but at a cost.

    I read the 1975 Tom Wicker book on the subject (A Time to Die) when it was published. It was a very thorough job of reporting by a highly regarded New York Times writer. I am surprised that there was enough to add to that to warrant a new book.
     

    Milad333

    Senior Member
    Armenian
    Thank you so much.
    maybe the author has found some more evidence that Wicker couldn't refer to.

    Yes, she considered Attica a vile place. But keep in mind prior to the uprising in the prison Attica was not a name on the tips of peoples' tongues. It was a largely invisible institution.
    By the way, Who did you mean by the "she"?
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Attica is a town in New York State (named after a town in Greece). Attica as a town was not well known until the big prison there made it into the news with this incident. Now when people hear the name, they think of the prison.

    I think the author is making a comparison to other towns that have become bywords for atrocity, either because there were massacres or pogroms or "ethnic cleansing" there, or because they housed exceptionally notorious prisons or death camps.

    I'm sure there are many such but one that comes to mind is Auschwitz. It's an old German town but it's known the world over since 1945 as the site of a Nazi death camp. The camp was only there for about ten years out of centuries of being an obscure town. But that's all someone outside of Germany would associate it with.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Attica is a town in New York State (named after a town in Greece). Attica as a town was not well known until the big prison there made it into the news with this incident. Now when people hear the name, they think of the prison.

    I think the author is making a comparison to other towns that have become bywords for atrocity, either because there were massacres or pogroms or "ethnic cleansing" there, or because they housed exceptionally notorious prisons or death camps.

    I'm sure there are many such but one that comes to mind is Auschwitz. It's an old German town but it's known the world over since 1945 as the site of a Nazi death camp. The camp was only there for about ten years out of centuries of being an obscure town. But that's all someone outside of Germany would associate it with.
    I think that is a well-reasoned reply and I agree.
     

    Milad333

    Senior Member
    Armenian
    Attica is a town in New York State (named after a town in Greece). Attica as a town was not well known until the big prison there made it into the news with this incident. Now when people hear the name, they think of the prison.

    I think the author is making a comparison to other towns that have become bywords for atrocity, either because there were massacres or pogroms or "ethnic cleansing" there, or because they housed exceptionally notorious prisons or death camps.

    I'm sure there are many such but one that comes to mind is Auschwitz. It's an old German town but it's known the world over since 1945 as the site of a Nazi death camp. The camp was only there for about ten years out of centuries of being an obscure town. But that's all someone outside of Germany would associate it with.
    Thanks a lot.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top