outright as a verb?

rich7

Senior Member
Venezuela español
"We could both agree to extend it or the Yankees could outright Hideki," Tellem said. "We could refuse it and then he could become a free agent with the ability to talk to the Yankees and other teams. Of course, the Yankees would have to agree to that, but the first priority is to get a deal done before the deadline.

meaning pls ?
 
  • nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    Sorry, but the sentence doesn't parse as written.

    The "Yankees could oust Hideki"

    Or they "could release Hideki outright"
     

    daviesri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Rich7,

    The sentence does not make sense no matter how i try to read it. It appears that the article you are reading is missing a verb around "outright". I am not sure what it is talking about so I cannot offer a good guess as to what the missing word may be.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I agree wtih daviesri in that something definitely seems missing.

    "We could both agree to extend it or the Yankees could outright (insert missing verb here) Hideki,"

    fire him?
    sign him?
    buy him out?

    I'm not sure what would make sense in context.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    In baseball a "free agent" is one who has met his contractual obligations, and is in a position to renegotiate his salary and other perks-- and the team is also in a position to cut him loose or offer him a renewal contingent on remedial measures, such as signing as a reliever rather than a starter, or doing a probationary stint in the minors.

    There are gray areas, and people start hinting around at their negotiating postures as the deadline approaches. I'm not sure about the particulars, but there are restricted free agents and outright ones. Well-- I just found a site that explains it all, or as much as I'd ever care to know. Here's the pertinent part:

    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Players currently Designated for Assignment:[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Their team has 10 days from the date of designation to trade, release, or outright the player to minors. When a player is designated for assignment, he does not count against either the 25-man or 40-man rosters. Plus, to outright a player, he must first clear waivers. Also, if player is released, the team must pay all of the remaining salary unless another team signs him--which can happen for as low as a prorated portion of the 316K minimum salary--in which case the original team would only pay the difference.

    So the word outright does exist as a verb. As I suspected, it's a highly specialized shoptalk term.
    .
    [/FONT]
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    foxfirebrand said:
    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]So the word outright does exist as a verb. As I suspected, it's a highly specialized shoptalk term.[/FONT]
    Ouch:eek:
    Is it acceptable, for my sanity, to restate this as:
    "The word outright does exist as a verb, but only for a very restricted definition of the verb exist."
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    Good one, panjandrum. :D Your statement reflects my feelings about such "verbs" as incent and gift as well.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    panjandrum said:
    Ouch:eek:
    Is it acceptable, for my sanity, to restate this as:
    "The word outright does exist as a verb, but only for a very restricted definition of the verb exist."
    When I was a cab driver, we used the word "personal" as a verb, as in "she personaled you." It meant someone calling for a cab asked specifically for that beady-eyed Fox fellow, and for that reason the call was given to you by the dispatcher, even though you're out of rotation.

    "Five? You've been personalled."
    "Five check."
    "It's Mrs DeJarnette, going to the beauty parlor."
    "Oh great. }squelch!{ "
    "A simple check will suffice, five-- for all you know she's right here in the office."
    "Yeah? In that case maybe she'll personal somebody else next time."

    Moral? It can pay to be civil to that little old lady all the other drivers growl at, unless she lives right downtown and that zone is all the farther she ever goes-- and she doesn't tip. Sure it's a quick 80 cents, but it puts you back to the bottom of the order, and there's a time call to the airport coming up in about fifteen minutes.
    .
     
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