outside/out of the corner of her dead mouth

redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
Do you use "out of" if some kind of motion is involved? Why outside is used in the following sentence? The drool run down from her lips to a brick". Thanks

A little drool had dripped outside the corner of her dead mouth onto a brick. Her whole body looked covered in dead skin.

Source: Survivor Chuck Palahniuk
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    A little drool had dripped outside the corner of her dead mouth onto a brick. Her whole body looked covered in dead skin.
    What a pretty image, RG!:eek::eek:

    I would definitely have expected to find out of there, rather than outside. Yes, you're right, out of is used to express motion, while outside is reserved for position:

    He went out of the living-room
    Drool had dripped out of the corner of her mouth onto a brick

    He's standing outside in the rain
    There were bloodstains outside the drawing-room


    Why Mr.Palahniuk chose to use the 'wrong' word is a mystery. Maybe in his particular variety of English it's okay to do that, or maybe he's trying to represent the speech of someone who doesn't speak 'standard' English. (It sounds very wrong to me.)
     
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