Outstanding Girls Club

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NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
Background: One of English practices is look at a picture and describe it in English. Today's task is give a name to a group of girls (aged 18 or so) in a study with book shelves, sofas etc.. All of them appear to be well-educated and good looking and exude a good sense of civility and team spirit. I've got three candidates but not sure whether such names work in English for a team of girls or not.

The names for choice:

(1) Outstanding Girls Club
(2) Excellent Girls Club
(3) Sexcellent Girls Club

Well, (3) is simply a humor in passing which will not be actually used.

The question of this thread is whether (1) or (2) is a proper name for such a team of girls.

Source: English scenario making practice by me.
 
  • NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thank you. :)

    Would you like to give a name for the team then?

    My understanding is that either "outstanding" or "excellent" would be used in honor titles awarded by organizations. For a clue it would be improper.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I used "club" or "team" in their loose sense:
    club: A club is an organization of people interested in a particular activity or subject who usually meet on a regular basis.
    team: any group of people who work together.

    In the context of the OP, they are dedicated to liberal arts and popular science.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Either a "club" or a "team" is an official group. You must apply to "join" the group (to become a "member") and the group has a list of "members".

    I used "club" or "team" in their loose sense
    Even in a loose sense, a "club" or "team" is an organization. We have no reason to believe that a group of young ladies in a photo are all members of a "team" or "club".

    "Excellent Girls Club" sounds like a name a 6-year-old girl would invent for her girls club. It sounds childish in AE.

    Is your assignment to describe the picture accurately, or to invent something (which may be fictional) that fits the picture? If you are inventing things, you could assume the young women are members of a college club or a college "sorority". College students are well-educated, and some sororities may prefer attractive members.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The names to choose from:

    (1) Outstanding Girls Club
    (2) Excellent Girls Club
    Titles usually begin with "The"

    It is not always a disadvantage, but
    The Outstanding/Excellent Girls Club can be understood as both
    1. The Club for Outstanding/Excellent Girls

    2. The Outstanding/Excellent Club for Girls
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If understood, this one would be considered inappropriate or at least raise eyebrows.
    To say the least!:D I'm not a raving feminist but even I would find Sexcellent Girls Club offensive/derogatory, not funny, speaking as a woman.

    I agree with the other comments above: I wouldn't use 1. or 2. either.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    That is why Gedanken experiment is important. Find problems and avoid them in reality.

    Your comment is much appreciated.
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    It's too bad you can't share the picture or you could get an idea of what descriptions people would suggest for it.

    Here's a picture I found in approximately the same theme on an image search:



    What words would you use to describe this picture?
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    A cordial student-teacher relationship beneficial of building up beautiful personalities.

    An atmosphere that paves the way to good emotion and wisdom.



    ===================================

    PS.Sorry I don't know how to upload pictures to our forum.
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I didn't upload the picture; I linked it. Try quoting my message to see the bb code that i used.

    I don't know how to upload pictures to this forum either, but one doesn't need to - upload it to imgur or some other image host site, and link it here.

    I think there's a deeper cultural question that is masking the language question and making it really hard to answer.

    For now, I will just agree with those above who say "team" or "club" does not work well as a picture description, though either could be a picture speculation; and "excellent" or "outstanding" sound odd in either one, though I think oddness is cultural rather than linguistic. I feel as though your "beneficial of building up beautiful personalities" and "paves the way to good emotion and wisdom" are also speculation rather than description, and are also culturally not what I would use or expect to hear or read as a speculation about who or what is pictured.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Please show one description rather than speculation as you've defined it if you'd like.


    < Off topic comment removed. Cagey, moderator >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I feel as though your "beneficial of building up beautiful personalities" and "paves the way to good emotion and wisdom" are also speculation rather than description, and are also culturally not what I would use or expect to hear or read as a speculation about who or what is pictured.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:
    Quite true. My first impression is that this was another case of "Chinglish."

    After many years on this forum, I've gained the impression that Chinese syntax is over-the-top positive, more than descriptive. That seems to be culture.

    Speaking as one who has written photo captions for hundreds of photos transmitted to newspapers, both nationally and internationally, I've learned:

    1. Keep your opinions out of them. This includes gratuitous descriptions.
    2. Don''t write a caption unless you know everything about the photo. Then write it without your opinion or sense of aggrandizement.

    Good luck.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    That's done by common sense.

    I simply followed this definition of "description": A description of someone or something is an account which explains what they are or what they look like.(Collins)

    It appears that you've defined it otherwise (e.g. you've inserted an extra-dimension: precision.)
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    That's done by common sense.

    I simply followed this definition of "description": A description of someone or something is an account which explains what they are or what they look like.(Collins)

    It appears that you've defined it otherwise (e.g. you've inserted an extra-dimension: precision.)
    In English, we professionals insert a qualification when we don't have precise information, e.g. "It appears to be ..."
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    "It appears to be ..."
    It looks like that in American English, "It appears to be..." is more appreciated.

    How about British English? Cambridge Dictionary offers this:

    Appear: to seem

    It appears (that) she left the party alone.


    (to be) is optional.


    But the most important question is: Can you yourself give an accurate description of the picture? If you can, show me.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    All of the above is fine. The important thing is that you indicate the tentative nature of the description where it is not certain..
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Writing captions for you is outside the scope of our forum.

    Some of the advice given above may be help you write your own.

    This thread is closed.

    Cagey, moderator
     
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