Outta Here

< Previous | Next >

namlan

Banned
Vietnam
Dear friends,

" I'm outta here!" means " I have to go now!" or " I'm leaving now", right? and is it common and polite to say?

Thanks a lot!

NamLan
 
  • Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    It's common, but it's very colloquial.
    It's for use with friends of your own age.

    You would not use it in formal situations.
     

    EastMidlandsMan

    Member
    England / English
    Depends whose saying it I think.
    Younger folk might find it acceptable in normal conversation, but more mature people would expect someone saying it to be leaving a situation which they find embarrassing or unacceptable, e.g. leaving the scene of a crime before they get caught!
     

    lizzeymac

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    We have the same usage here in AE, it depends on who's saying it. It is colloquial, very casual.

    In general, it means I am leaving - I am about to to be out of here, I am gone.

    When my teenage cousins say it, it may means they are escaping before their mother discovers the mess they left in the kitchen. It is said while running for the door.

    When I say it at work at 5 pm on Friday while walking towards the door, it means I am not stopping no matter who needs me, do not tell me I have a call on line 3, I am leaving, I am already gone, Bye bye!
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I used it routinely, as did my contemporaries, in the 1960s and 1970s. It was ordinary, casual speech for, "I'm done here, and am on my way" or in the plural, "We're outta here", meaning let's get going. It's still in widespread use in AE, still casual, and still a little more emphatic than "I'm leaving". Lizzeymac's explanation
    captures the tone very nicely.
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    In case you're tested, outa has one t.

    Aw, shucks, there's that in case again.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I associate this expression with New York City, especially with New York Italians as portrayed in movies and on television, like the similar expression "Fageddabouddit" (meaning "No, and don't ask again").
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    We have the same usage here in AE, it depends on who's saying it. It is colloquial, very casual.

    In general, it means I am leaving - I am about to to be out of here, I am gone.

    When my teenage cousins say it, it may means they are escaping before their mother discovers the mess they left in the kitchen. It is said while running for the door.

    When I say it at work at 5 pm on Friday while walking towards the door, it means I am not stopping no matter who needs me, do not tell me I have a call on line 3, I am leaving, I am already gone, Bye bye!
    Great explanation.

    I would add one thing. I use it when I'm angry.

    "This is bull****. I'm outta here."

    (And I don't care what the fools do after I leave!) ;)

    Gaer
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top