over by the bar

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
A waiter brings champagne to Edward's room and asks where it to put. Edward: Uh, over by the bar. The waiter comes up to, something like a table-couter, and puts the tray on it. (I don't know if there was a bar there, because it didn't get into the shot).
("Pretty woman")

Am I right that Edward meant: "put the tray on that table-couter which, as you can see, is beside the bar".
Thanks.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    From the Word Reference dictionary on "bar":
    5: a counter or room where alcoholic drinks are served

    6: a counter, room, or establishment where a particular range of goods, food, services, etc, are sold: a coffee bar, a heel bar
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    One might say that on top of the bar is very near the bar. Without seeing the picture, it's hard to say what other options, if any, the waiter might have had.
     

    kool-wind

    Senior Member
    British English
    When you say "I'm over here" or "He's over there" these are just indications of roughly where you or he are, and the word 'over' is almost unnecessary but that's the way it's said.

    It's the same with "over by the bar". It just means "over there somewhere, in the general vicinity of the bar".
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    In case it's not clear, what you are calling a counter-table is what Edward referred to as a bar. The waiter put the tray on the bar, not near it, but that doesn't matter.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    In case it's not clear, what you are calling a counter-table is what Edward referred to as a bar. The waiter put the tray on the bar, not near it, but that doesn't matter.
    But why did not he say the "on"? What if, when he said "over", the waiter would have misunderstood him and put the tray on the floor, by (near)the bar?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    But why did not he say the "on"? What if, when he said "over", the waiter would have misunderstood him and put the tray on the floor, by (near)the bar?
    He wanted it to be placed in a general area. There may or may not be a suitable place to put something in the area. "On the bar" may be the only suitable place to put the champagne that is over by the bar, i.e. there is no other raised, flat surface near the bar, but the speaker doesn't know or doesn't care enough to think about it.
    Placing the champagne on the floor would be very unusual. It would go against the waiter's common sense to do so. The waiter might be fired for putting the champagne on the floor even if the customer told him to do it.
    It's just a movie. ;)
     
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