oversimplification of the terms

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RORSCHACH

Senior Member
Farsi-persian
Hi
I was reading an article about Latin American literary movement which is called "Boom". In this part the author is saying that on critic was saying that New Novel in Latin America was not something new because James Joyce had already done these things, but nobody was listening to him.

my question is: Is this "oversimplification of the terms" an idiom or something? or the author means it literally. please help me to understand this part.



The fact that his argument did not seem convincing and was never taken seriously was due in large measure to the difficulty of believing that so manifestly vigorous and apparently creative a cultural phenomenon could be merely mimetic, and it is clearer to us now that this was a debate between antagonists who were not listening to one another and did not in any case speak the same language, which explains the oversimplification of the terms in which it was conducted. Hoping to clarify rather than simplify, we might say that the new fiction was certainly not mediocre, nor was it merely mimetic, but neither was it entirely new.


thanks in advance
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello RORSCHACH

    No, it's not an idiom.

    Although what the author means by it here I really don't know:(.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    It's difficult to understand or explain without more information about who is saying what. The quotation is does not include many specifics.
    With that limitation, my explanation is this:

    The two sides were arguing without really paying attention to each others positions. In addition, they didn't speak the same language. The result was the terms in which the argument was conducted were oversimplified. [= They argued as though the issues were simpler and more clear cut than they really were.]

    You may simplify something to make it easier for someone else to understand, so they will really understand when you have explained it. If you 'oversimpliy' it, you have given a version that is too simple to be accurate.
     

    RORSCHACH

    Senior Member
    Farsi-persian
    But here "terms" means: word or phrase? or the condition in which they were doing the debate or argument?
     
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