overweight (noun)

sibu

Senior Member
Can you "suffer from overweight"? "Suffer from being overweight" sounds more natural to me. Surprisingly, the Oxford Learner's Dictionary does not even list overweight as a noun, whereas the Forums dictionary does.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Overweight" can be a noun, but its use is rather limited. People may suffer from being overweight, where "overweight" is an adjective.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree with Paul. The only way in which overweight is commonly used as a noun (despite its dictionary definition: excessive weight) is when “the overweight” is used to mean “those [people] who are overweight”.
     

    sibu

    Senior Member
    Then we have the absolute adjective that operates as a noun: "The overweight are prone to heart attacks and joint problems."

    See also suffer from overweight | English examples in context | Ludwig
    Now I'm confused:confused: The website you sent a link to does list examples of "overweight" used as a noun, for example this sentence from a medical journal:

    Along with the binge eating, about 65% of patients with BED suffer from overweight or obesity leading to a twofold higher risk for obesity-associated somatic diseases.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Why are you confused? That’s one use of overweight as a noun, but it’s not an everyday one that you’d hear in casual conversation. And even in a formal context, “suffer from overweight” (rather than just “be overweight”) sounds pretty unnatural to me.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The website you sent a link to does list examples of "overweight" used as a noun,
    Yes, that is why I posted the link.

    I suspect that the majority of such uses as "65% of patients with BED suffer from overweight " are AE or "jargon" rather than normal BE. You will have to wait for an AE speaker for an AE opinion.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    My AE opinion is that "65% of patients with BED suffer from overweight or obesity" is not ordinary spoken English. Either this is medical jargon or it's a mistake. I can imagine that the author (or editor in a hurry) was trying to deal with an original text that read "suffer from being overweight or obesity" and decided not to go with "65% of patients with BED are overweight or obese, leading ...".
     

    Steven David

    Senior Member
    Standard General American English USA
    Can you "suffer from overweight"? "Suffer from being overweight" sounds more natural to me. Surprisingly, the Oxford Learner's Dictionary does not even list overweight as a noun, whereas the Forums dictionary does.

    Yes, it is possible to suffer from overweight. For example, overweight is a symptom of metabolic syndrome. Those who experience metabolic syndrome may suffer from overweight and the discomforting effects of the condition of overweight.

    Here's an example of the phrase in context:

    People who suffer from overweight and obesity are at increased risk for a number of health-related problems, including:

    Obesity and Related Health Conditions | Mercy
     
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    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I have definitely heard it used but always thought it sounded strange. I don't remember the contexts where I heard it.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Good morning - I just woke up. The WRF dictionary is quite helpful:
    n.
    1. extra or excess weight above what law or regulation allows, as of baggage or freight:The overweight will cost us $12.
    2. weight in excess of that considered normal, proper, healthful, etc.:Overweight in a child should not be neglected.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "Suffer from overweight" doesn't sound particulaly strange to me. Here are a couple of the Google Books hits for the phrase:
    Although some binge eaters maintain a normal weight, the vast majority suffer from overweight and obesity.​
    Karen Sullivan - 2004​
    Not only are children with lower self-esteem or emotional issues more likely to suffer from overweight, but the self-esteem and self-respect of even the emotionally healthiest children can take a huge battering when they have a weight problem.​
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I read that one too, JS, but is this ordinary AmE? It would not be said like that in BrE, except possibly as medical jargon, which I know nothing about.
    It was new to me (both as AE and BE speaker:)). The example does sound health-related, but is not an everyday term for me - but I don't have children.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's unremarkable in a medical or dietary context. A person could suffer from overweight, obesity, severe obesity or morbid obesity. The classification depends on body mass index. The choice of noun or adjective depends on the structure of the sentence.
     
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