pórtico/portón de peajes

gvergara

Senior Member
Español
Hi,

I have no idea what you call a portón/pórtico de peajes in the US. I'm talking about this metallic structure which is used to levy fees for using the highways and discourage peak hour travel. Cameras and antennae and other technological stuff are affixed to them so that people don't stop in order to pay the toll (just drive through them and pay the peaje bill at the end of the month). I've read they're called electronic road pricing gantry in Singapore, and in Santiago we have a similar system, but I don't know how to translate it properly.

Thanks in advance,

Gonzalo
 
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  • lauranazario

    Moderatrix
    Español puertorriqueño & US English
    En los Estados Unidos se les conoce como un toll gantry
    Truck toll gantry installed over Route 6 in Providence
    The third gantry in Rhode Island's statewide truck toll system went up over Route 6 in Providence early Wednesday...
    Source
    saludos,
    LN
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    En los Estados Unidos se les conoce como un toll gantry

    saludos,
    LN
    If you had used that term with me, I’d have had no idea what you were referring to. I’m familiar with the devices, but I’ve never heard a name put to them. For lack of knowledge of a better term, I’d have called it an EZ Pass fast lane reader.
     

    lauranazario

    Moderatrix
    Español puertorriqueño & US English
    For lack of knowledge of a better term, I’d have called it an EZ Pass fast lane reader.
    Yes, but that term you're using (EZ Pass fast lane reader) does not apply to the object described on post #1, since "fast lane" was a designation used within toll plazas to indicate special lanes where you didn't need to go through 'manned' booths in which a human took your money and lifted the mechanical arm to let you through.

    Since a gantry is erected over an entire road and there is no toll plaza (with slower or faster lanes), you cannot use the 'fast lane' nomenclature to refer to this specific kind of toll-collecting structure. It is, simply, the toll gantry.

    We all learn something new every day, right? ;)

    saludos,
    LN
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Yes, but that term you're using (EZ Pass fast lane reader) does not apply to the object described on post #1, since "fast lane" was a designation used within toll plazas to indicate special lanes where you didn't need to go through 'manned' booths in which a human took your money and lifted the mechanical arm to let you through.

    Since a gantry is erected over an entire road and there is no toll plaza (with slower or faster lanes), you cannot use the 'fast lane' nomenclature to refer to this specific kind of toll-collecting structure. It is, simply, the toll gantry.

    We all learn something new every day, right? ;)

    saludos,
    LN
    My point was that the average person has no idea what a gantry is. I assume it’s a word known to people in the toll collection industry, but it’s Greek to me.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I had never heard of a toll gantry, either, but apparently they are building one right here in my city at the Golden Gate Bridge. Here is a page that shows photos and describes it.

    I have seen a number of TV news reports about this new system, which will replace the familiar tollbooth (both human-manned and FasTrak lanes), but I don't recall the reporters ever using the term "toll gantry." I agree that the average person would not understand what it is, at least not yet.

    So I did learn something today (thanks, Laura), but a translation of the Spanish portón/pórtico de peajes might need some explanatory text so that the reader will understand what it means.
     

    gvergara

    Senior Member
    Español
    Maybe toll gate is more straightforward and can more easily be understood even without knowing what they actually are???
     
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    lauranazario

    Moderatrix
    Español puertorriqueño & US English
    Maybe toll gate is more straightforward and can more easily be understood even without knowing what they actually are???
    I know you are trying to find a 'simpler' term in hopes that more people will understand it, but 'toll gate' is not it.
    You see, the problem is that 'toll gate' happens to be a synonym of 'toll booth'... and the structure you have been mentioning in post #1 looks nothing like a toll booth and definitely isn't one. There is no 'booth' structure or 'gate' structure through which you actually pass.
    tollgate
    noun [ C ] UK /ˈtəʊl.ɡeɪt/ US /ˈtoʊl.ɡeɪt/ (US usually tollbooth)
    i
    picture of tollgate

    a gate on a road or bridge at which you pay an amount of money in order to be allowed to use the road or bridge
    Source
    Toll gantries are used as part of an electronic toll collection system that can be easily put in place on any road or highway.

    My recommendation? Stick to the correct term equivalency even if it happens to be a technical term. You, as a translator, are not responsible for simplifying what the author wrote in the original text.

    Hope that helps,
    LN
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    If the original is clear to the average reader, so should the translation. What is your context? What’s the sentence?
     

    gvergara

    Senior Member
    Español
    It is a paper that posits that artificial intelligence has to start being used in order to prevent traffic accidents. They start out by describing how they have been collecting accident-related information so far.

    Original sentence: Recientemente, se han empezado a utilizar datos de pórticos de peaje con sistema de Identificación Automática de Vehículos (IAV). Este sistema rara vez falla porque la detección generalmente se utiliza para cobrar peajes.
    My attempt: As of late, the data provided by toll gantries that use a system of Vehicle Automatic Identification (VAI) have begun to be used. This system rarely fails to provide accurate information, as detection is a core element in the toll payment process.

    G.
     
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    Marsianitoh

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    In my neck of the woods we call these things " arco de peaje"Colocan el arco de peaje de Astigarraga. Noticias de Gipuzkoa . I've found this in an article about toll collectorsToll collectors going the way of the Dodo bird :
    "With cashless tolling systems, drivers pass under arches called gantries. They contain sensors that detect transponders or tags that motorists affix to their car to electronically record toll fares. Cameras also photograph the license plate."
    So you could write something along the lines of " ...data collected from (electronic tolling systems consisting of) arches called gantries "
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    So you could write something along the lines of " ...data collected from (electronic tolling systems consisting of) arches called gantries "
    I like that idea of adding additional information to inform the reader.

    After reading this thread yesterday, I asked nine people if they had heard about the new system being put in place here in SF. All nine had heard about it. I then asked if they knew what a toll gantry was. None did. So, at least in this part of the world, this seems to be an emerging technology whose official name has not yet permeated the consciousness of the general public.
     

    crobert

    Member
    Spanish
    Maybe toll gate is more straightforward and can more easily be understood even without knowing what they actually are???
    As constructed, toll gates affect highway capacity, they are usually physical obstructions with mechanical arms. On the other hand, toll gantries are overhead high speed readers. But if gantry sounds too exotic, they can be called high speed toll readers.
     
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