paces and fledges

shining Sun

Member
italian
Hello there!

Here I am again with one of those questions of mine :p

Here are the lyrics of a song by John Anderson (I suppose it must be a homonym of the American country singer).

He sings of the black ducks flying over the Merri Creek through galleries of red gum:

...
of duck through galleries of red gum - but
here in their absence the cliffs lend that
vista that paces and fledges each dip, makes
the history of that flight visible


Honestly I found the whole quite cryptic....but especially that "paces and fledges each dip". Shame on me, but I don't even quite understand if paces and fledges are used as nouns or verbs.

Here's my translation attempt:

...
delle anatre attraverso le gallerie degli eucalipti - ma
qui in loro assenza i precipizi offrono quella
vista (o quello spettacolo) che _____________________________ , rende
visibile la storia di quel volo


I know fledges could be the young birds ready to fly. I know to fledge means to get the plumage.
To pace has something to do with rhythm
dip: maybe dip here means picchiata (quando gli uccelli calano in picchiata)????

I just can't combine these 3 words (paces fledges dip) into a sentence which makes sense ;-)

Please, be patient with me :eek:

thanks for any suggestion

soleada
 
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  • joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Hi soleada - Yes, this is quite cryptic and you're right - paces could be a noun or verb. Fledges, though, is a verb. (Fledglings are the baby birds.) So what does it mean?
    Could it be that the silhouette (profile) of the cliffs mimics the up and down movement of the ducks? Because it says "in their absence," so he is imagining the ducks while looking at the cliffs. But I don't know what to do with "paces and fledges, sorry :confused:
     

    AlabamaBoy

    Senior Member
    American English
    The dictionary defines "fledge" as to raise and care for something until it is ready to be on its own. In a poetic way, I suppose that the winds near the cliffs pace and care for each flight until the right moment for the "dip" (dive).
     

    SPQR

    Senior Member
    US
    American English

    of duck through galleries of red gum - but
    here in their absence the cliffs lend that
    vista that paces and fledges each dip, makes
    the history of that flight visible


    A poor attempt:

    delle anatre attraverso le gallerie degli eucalipti - ma
    qui in loro assenza i precipizi offrono quella
    vista che dà un'andatura e alleva ogni discesa
    e rende/rendendo la storia del volo visibile.
     

    shining Sun

    Member
    italian
    rThank you very much, joanvillafane, AlabamaBoy and SPQR!!!! :)

    Now it's becoming much much clearer to me :eek:

    Thank you for your beautiful interpretation


    of duck through galleries of red gum - but
    here in their absence the cliffs lend that
    vista that paces and fledges each dip, makes
    the history of that flight visible


    A poor attempt:

    delle anatre attraverso le gallerie degli eucalipti - ma
    qui in loro assenza i precipizi offrono quella
    vista che dà un'andatura e alleva ogni discesa
    e rende/rendendo la storia del volo visibile.
    This translation works very well for me....I'm just reflecting about "alleva", what about "si prende cura", as suggested by AlabamaBoy?
    But maybe "allenare" (to train) gives more the idea of trying again and again as it is the first flight of a young bird. It was that you meant, SPQR?

    Thank you for you precious help ;-)

    sole
     
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