Palestine comic book_getting the business behind a closed door...

sadahzinia

Member
Greek Greece
Hi,
I'm trying to figure out the meaning in a comic book I'm reading about Palestine and about the interrogations that took place there during 1990.
it is written by an american journalist, Joe Sacco, but there 's this phrase that I can't really understand what he means...
Also, the way he's drawn it, you can't tell whether it is a woman (ex-prisoner) or the writer talking...
Although, I'm pretty sure it is the woman talking...
Here is the phrase (I would appreciate any help) - Also, excuse the language, it is a bit harsh towards the end...:


"Someone in the Gaza strip once told me, 'When you are under inerrogation, you forget the name of your father.' Me? I wonder how long I'd last getting the business behind a closed door... Not long I bet, but I'm a pu...y first class... a harsh word and a dirty look and I'd be screaming for Amnesty Int'l...

I need help with the underlined phrases...
Thanks,
S.
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    "Getting the business" is a fairly old-fashioned way of saying
    getting abused or beaten.

    Amnesty International is an organization that attempts, through publicity, to protect prisoners and others who are subject to abuse by those in power.

    Hence, "I wonder how long I would be able to withstand the pain if I were being interrogated, with physical punishment or torture, in a locked room."
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Happy to try to help. I suspect the speaker is the writer, that
    the writer is male, and over the age of 50. Women rarely call themselves pussies. The term is often used by men to mean "coward". In this use it is not a reference to female anatomy, although you might argue that it is, by extension, an anatomical reference used, symbolicallly, to mean woman, and hence effeminate and thus cowardly. That's a stretch, but you should be aware of the possible implications if you are translating.
     

    sadahzinia

    Member
    Greek Greece
    ofcourse! You are right... "Coward" is the meaning that is most adequate, as the writer keeps having a humouristic attitude towards himself throughout the book...
    Thanks again!
    s.
     
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