Palestinian Arabic: pronunciation of مع السلامة

Anatoli

Senior Member
русский (Russian)
Thanks, Elias. :)

note the pronunciation
"ma3 as-salaame" vs "ma`a 's-salaama"

I used ` (backquote) for 3 (3ayn-`ayn), the only real difference in pronunciation (if we ignore the position of "a" between the 2 words) is the final "e".
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Your version a instead of e is used in colloquial outside of shami.:)
    Not to complicate matters further, or to drag this thread farther off-topic, but even in certain dialects within Shami the -a version is used. The -e version, though, is "standard" in Palestinian Arabic.
     

    Abu Rashid

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    elroy,

    The -e version, though, is "standard" in Palestinian Arabic

    I think this really depends on the area. In Ghazzah for instance, the standard pronunciation for taa2 marboutah is prevalent, and it seems that there is some kind of "gradient" effect, in that the further you move towards ash-Sham (Dimashq) the more prevalent the kasrah sound on the letter preceding taa2 marboutah becomes, whilst the closer you get to Egypt the opposite occurs.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    What you say may be true (I'm not familiar with the Gaza accent), but my point was that the -e pronunciation is "neutral" in Palestinian; i.e. you can't identify someone's origin based on that factor. An -a pronunciation sounds Bedouin (at least to me), whereas an -i pronunciation sounds Galilean.

    "Standard" Palestinian tends to be based on the Jerusalem dialect.
     

    Abu Rashid

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    i.e. you can't identify someone's origin based on that factor.

    Well you could probably guess someone using the kasrah sound would be from the West Bank. You're probably right about the Bedouin factor though, so that would confuse it a little more.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Well you could probably guess someone using the kasrah sound would be from the West Bank.
    I'm assuming you're talking about -e (there's also -i, which is more like a kasra sound).

    There are many people outside the West Bank who use the -e pronunciation. As I said, it's more or less neutral; if Palestinian Arabic were to ever become standardized, that would be the pronunciation chosen as the standard.
     
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