pamper/treat

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kansi

Senior Member
japanese
Mother's Day is just around the corner, and that can mean only one thing – it's time to treat that special lady in your life. If the way to the hearts of the mothers in your life is through their stomachs, then you'll be pleased to know that there are various restaurants around the city that are pulling out all the stops with special menus and offers exclusively for this day. Here are some of the best Mother's Day menus in Hong Kong.
Best Mothers Day menus in Hong Kong

This year, show your love for Mom with a present that does double-duty: a gift she can use to pamper herself with now while she’s stuck at home, then toss in her suitcase once we’re cleared for travel again.
Mother’s Day Gift Guide: Travel Accessories To Pamper Her Now (And Pack Later)

That treat and that pamper in the contexts seem to have very similar meanings.

The difference is that to treat is to buy something to someone for the purpose of pampering and to pamper is to do whatever we can do to make someone satisfied, one of whose popular action is to treat?
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    it's time to treat that special lady in your life.
    This seems an unusual doesn't seem a very correct use of "treat" to me, if you mean "give her a treat". I'd say It's time to give her a treat. (Edited)
    The difference is that to treat is to buy something to someone for the purpose of pampering and to pamper is to do whatever we can do to make someone satisfied, one of whose popular action is to treat?
    Something like that, yes. You could also give someone a treat because you want to celebrate something, or to congratulate or encourage them, or just because you feel like it. It doesn't have to be to pamper them.

    To pamper someone or yourself is to indulge that person, and give them more than they'd normally expect. It can be habitual--for example you might pamper a child, or it could be an occasional thing--you might pamper your wife on her birthday. It can sometimes have a negative overtone.
     
    Last edited:

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    Something like that, yes. You could also give someone a treat because you want to celebrate something, or to congratulate or encourage them, or just because you feel like it. It doesn't have to be to pamper them.
    Ah to treat them isn't always to pamper them. Is the core meaning of treat giving, not necessarilly buying?
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Is the core meaning of treat giving, not necessarilly buying?
    Yes, though it generally involves buying something. :)

    But you can give someone a treat without buying them anything, such as by giving them an experience--taking them somewhere they want to go, for instance.
     
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    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    You normally give someone a treat by giving them an experience they enjoy, which could involve buying something, like a meal at a restaurant, or not involve buying anything, like taking a child who enjoys going to the zoo there.

    I wouldn't call buying someone a dress a treat. You might hear something like "He treated me to a new dress" when referring to a present bought for a special occasion but it isn't very common.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    This doesn't seem a very correct use of "treat" to me, if you mean "give her a treat".
    I am very familiar with this usage from Yorkshire: I suppose it is regional. In fact, it has an irregular past tense, tret rhyming with threat.
    It was my birthday on Saturday and my mum tret me - we went to the zoo. (Implies that she paid.)
    (I have never seen this past tense written so I am not sure how to spell it!)
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    I am very familiar with this usage from Yorkshire: I suppose it is regional. In fact, it has an irregular past tense, tret rhyming with threat.
    It was my birthday on Saturday and my mum tret me - we went to the zoo. (Implies that she paid.)
    (I have never seen this past tense written so I am not sure how to spell it!)
    It's not treated??tret is correct?

    So it would be fine to use treat as a verb to mean give someone a treat?
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    "Treat" is often a verb. I suppose you mean the way it's used in this sentence.

    I don't find it particularly correct but let's see what others say.
    Yes, in the way to mean to give someone a treat.
     
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