Pan (nombre)

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Micipitici

New Member
romanian
Hola a todos,

Intento de traducir un libro en cual el personaje principal es el dios Pan. El problema es que su nombre aparece en diminutivo como Pánfilo, Pancillo, Pancito. Intento de traducir el nombre a inglés, pero no se si es consejable. En los libros con Harry Potter se que se traducen los nombres. Me gustaria hacer lo mismo con este libro que traduzco. Por ejemplo, Pancito podria ser traducido como honeybun. Con Pancillo todavia no tengo una idea. Sería una buena idea de traducir los nombres o dejarlos como aparecen en el texto original?
 
  • micafe

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    No sé de qué idioma estás traduciendo. El Dios Pan se llama así y no veo cómo se le puede cambiar el nombre. Es como cambiarle el nombre a la diosa Venus. No tendría sentido.
     

    cvermar

    Senior Member
    Mexico/US/Canada
    Puedes usar palabras como:
    Panache, Panda, Pandemic, Pander, Pancake, Pannier, Pansy, Panorama, Pantheon, Panorama, Panzer
    o nombres como:
    Panos, Pankaj, Pancho, Panfilo
    dependiendo del tono del apodo en español.

    (¿Me imagino que son apodos?)
     

    Micipitici

    New Member
    romanian
    No sé de qué idioma estás traduciendo. El Dios Pan se llama así y no veo cómo se le puede cambiar el nombre. Es como cambiarle el nombre a la diosa Venus. No tendría sentido.
    Traduzco de español a inglés. No quiero cambiar el nombre de Pan, solo añadir algo al nombre,porque es en diminutivo. Por ejemplo, algo como Pancito,podría traducirse en inglés como "Pan honeybun" o aunque "honeybun", sin mencionar el nombre de Pan, porque del contexto se entiende quien habla. Como traductor, tengo considerar cada aspecto, no? Si es posible traducir los nombres, no veo porque no intentar.
     

    cvermar

    Senior Member
    Mexico/US/Canada
    Micipitici, estoy de acuerdo, pero también sería bueno dejarlo como una palabra. Son diminutivos, y también juego de palabras, y muy difícil de traducir. Mira por ejemplo en wikipedia cómo se traducen los personajes de Tintin o Asterix. Los nombres cambian mucho. También las expresiones que usa el capitán en Tintin, muy chistosas, varían de un lenguaje al otro. Pero lo que tratan de preservar es el tono y el espíritu.

    Por eso, yo traduciría "Pancito" como "Pancake" (si está jugando con que "Pan" y "pan" son homófonos) o "Panny", "Pannie" o "Panno" (si no se refiere al pan). Igual, "Pancillo" como "Pannie" o "Pannish" y "Pánfilo" como "Pancho" (que es un nombre que se conoce más que Pánfilo en inglés, me parece). ¡Pero no hay duda de que es muy difícil y van a haber muchas opiniones diferentes!

    Mira aquí también: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diminutive#English para encontrar ideas de diminutivos que podrías usar.

    Depende mucho del contexto (el tono y la intención del interlocutor).
     

    Lis48

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The only possibly acceptable derivative for me would be Pannie/Panny which sounds like a child.
    For a god, we would just use a term of endearment such as my darling Pan, my sweet Pan, my gorgeous Pan etc.
    Pan honeybun sounds horrible to my British ears! But not as bad perhaps as pancake! :)
     

    cvermar

    Senior Member
    Mexico/US/Canada
    Lis48, I agree, pancake is pretty bad, but if the person is playing with the fact that you can eat "un pancito" then I was looking for something that could be used that was a riff on Pan that was edible. As for diminutives, English actually has a lot of different forms such as -en -o -ish -ock -ling -kins etc. as discussed in the wikipedia article. I was going to suggest "Pansie" too, though I omitted it due to its other connotations. So, you could go with Panling, Pannikins, etc. as well.

    I know nothing of the context, but clearly the person calling Pan these names is being very playful with the name. People play with names and words all the time. I do it with my kids (Nico-Tico, Tico-Lico, etc for my son Nicolás, for instance). Or, as anther example, when my kids get the hiccups, which they hate, I distract them with a game of coming up with words that start with "hipo" (hipódromo, hipocampo, Hipólito, hipotenusa, hipótesis, hipotermia...) which seems to do the job.
     

    Jim2996

    Senior Member
    American English
    Pan is the name of a Greek god, and you can't/shouldn't mess with it too much.

    One option is to use epithets. Homer, the famous Greek writer, did this all the time. The idea is to take whatever you want the Spanish suffixes to represent and use them before Pan. Usually they are repeated over and over again. You have to choose your own, but, for example:

    sweet, dear Pan
    nymph-seeking Pan
    wild and crazy Pan
    sly and mischievous Pan
    shepherd-protector Pan

    After a while, people will recognize
    nymph-seeker
    shepherd-protector
    or
    one with little horns
    goat man.

    Epithets can also be placed after the name.
    Athena whose shield is thunder
    Athena hope of soldiers
    Athena tireless one
    I think several people are: ____ the lionhearted.

    There is a huge literature on epithets in Homer. You can google it.
    The more common/everyday word is nickname.

    Bye the way, the pan in pancake has absolutely nothing to do with bread. It's a frying pan. Now they are more often cooked on griddles, but still more often called pancakes than griddlecakes.

    I hope this gives you some ideas.
     
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    Micipitici

    New Member
    romanian
    Pan is the name of a Greek god, and you can't/shouldn't mess with it too much.

    One option is to use epithets. Homer, the famous Greek writer, did this all the time. The idea is to take whatever you want the Spanish suffixes to represent and use them before Pan. Usually they are repeated over and over again. You have to choose your own, but, for example:

    sweet, dear Pan
    nymph-seeking Pan
    wild and crazy Pan
    sly and mischievous Pan
    shepherd-protector Pan

    After a while, people will recognize
    nymph-seeker
    shepherd-protector
    or
    one with little horns
    goat man.

    Epithets can also be placed after the name.
    Athena whose shield is thunder
    Athena hope of soldiers
    Athena tireless one
    I think several people are: ____ the lionhearted.

    There is a huge literature on epithets in Homer. You can google it.
    The more common/everyday word is nickname.

    Bye the way, the pan in pancake has absolutely nothing to do with bread. It's a frying pan. Now they are more often cooked on griddles, but still more often called pancakes than griddlecakes.

    I hope this gives you some ideas.

    Thank you all, gracias a todos por la ayuda y todas las ideas. Sus opiniones y los links que me han ofrecido son de mucha ayuda.
     

    cvermar

    Senior Member
    Mexico/US/Canada
    Pan is the name of a Greek god, and you can't/shouldn't mess with it too much.
    I think what matters is what the author's intention in the original. I don't think one can say that you shouldn't mess with a God's name, if that is what is done in the original text. (And it is enough to take a look at Rick Riordan's enormously popular YA novels with Greek, Roman and Egyptian gods to see that it happens.)

    Bye the way, the pan in pancake has absolutely nothing to do with bread. It's a frying pan. Now they are more often cooked on griddles, but still more often called pancakes than griddlecakes.
    I am aware that pan in pancake has nothing to do with bread, but with a cooking pan. Believe me, I have made plenty for my kids! :)


    From what little detail Micipitici used, I gather that someone is talking to or about Pan calling him names such as "Pánfilo, Pancillo, Pancito". She/he gave no further detail, but did seem to imply that "Pancito" was used as if it were a little bread, rather than a diminutive of Pan. So, if the text requires a nickname that is derived from Pan, and is edible, then pancake might fit. (Without further context, I am sure I don't know). For the others, Pánfilo is a name that isn't even Greek, but Latin, so I guess it's a riff on Pan. I used to call my son Nicolás Nicodemo sometimes, and I was reminded of that (haven't done it for years). For diminutives, if lots of different ones are used, then there are lots of options in English, such as Panny, Pannie, Pannikins, Panling, Pannock, Panno, Pannen, Pannino, etc...

    Surely the aim is to capture the tone and spirit of the writing? It doesn't sound to me as if the text has a Homeric ring to it! ;)
     
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