Pan Seared Cod dish

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  • GavinW

    Senior Member
    British English
    You know, it could be "dorato". I had to do a restaurant menu recently (thanks, WR contributors...), and had trouble with dorato. "Pan-seared" would probably have done the trick, and clearly beats "flash-fried" (which probably involves a lot more oil) or "seared" tout court, while "browned" was clearly way off base.
     

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    GavinW said:
    You know, it could be "dorato". I had to do a restaurant menu recently (thanks, WR contributors...), and had trouble with dorato. "Pan-seared" would probably have done the trick, and clearly beats "flash-fried" (which probably involves a lot more oil) or "seared" tout court, while "browned" was clearly way off base.
    Maybe you're right, Gavin, the word could be "dorato".
    Or rather, as we say here : "fritto dorato", and fritto=fried (in English "dorato" could be "golden brown"?)
     
    On AE menus "pan seared" refers usually to fish that is cooked briefly on each side in a very hot pan with little or no oil, leaving the inside rare or raw. This often is done with slices of tuna. I have never heard of doing it with cod -- I suppose you could, but I wouldn't order it myself; I'd be afraid of catching the cold cod cobbles. To me, "browned," or "dorato," implies more oil and cooking all the way through, perhaps having dusted a bit of flour on the fish first (meuniere).
     

    GavinW

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thanks, Carrickp, that is a very nice answer. Wish I'd known earlier! I'll go away and ask my chef friend what he really meant. Your "(pan-)seared" looks like it's 'sealing' the flavo(u)r;) in, so maybe it's a bit different from "dorato".

    I toyed with "golden-brown", but that's more the appearance, without really describing the process.
     
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