par ou barre oblique?

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Sush

Member
Canada - English
Bonjour,

Est-ce quelqu'un pourrait me dire si le mot "par" se remplace par une barre oblique en français comme il le fait en anglais?

Par exemple: 4$ par personne - 4$/personne

Merci bien de votre réponse!
 
  • 20100

    Senior Member
    Français - Canada, English - Canada
    Bonsoir,

    effectivement il est possible d'utiliser la barre oblique puisqu'elle est un symbole et un symbole amène la même idée dans toutes les langues (d'autres exemples: @,$,%,?, ...)

    Cordialement Votre,

    Vincent


    P.S. Correction d'erreur
     

    LMorland

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think your question is a good one, Sush, because not all symbols are used across all languages, in my experience. For example, the French don't use & (the ampersand), so far as I can tell after nearly 10 years of living in France. The @ sign wasn't used either, I don't believe, until the Internet came along, and so you have to go through a little rigmarole in order to produce one on a French computer keyboard.

    But to answer your question, I simply typed "Euros/personne" into Google and produced a goodly number of results, so the answer is yes.

    (I'm curious, though -- does one put the dollar sign after numbers in Canada? Because we don't in the U.S. When I write equivancies, I put e.g., $150 = 102 € , observing the proper position of the sign in each language.)

    __________
    The actual exchange rate as of today, sad to report....
     
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    itka

    Senior Member
    français
    For example, the French don't use & (the ampersand) at all
    Do you think so ? It does exist on french keyboard (une esperluète) and it's currently used to name societies (have a look here) and in commercial mail.
    That's true we don't use it in novels.
    More on wiki.
     

    SteveD

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think your question is a good one, Sush, because not all symbols are used across all languages, in my experience. For example, the French don't use & (the ampersand) at all, so far as I can tell after nearly 10 years of living in France. The @ sign wasn't used either, I don't believe, until the Internet came along, and so you have to go through a little rigmarole in order to produce one on a French computer keyboard.

    But to answer your question, I simply typed "Euros/personne" into Google and produced a goodly number of results, so the answer is yes.

    (I'm curious, though -- does one put the dollar sign after numbers in Canada? Because we don't in the U.S. When I write equivancies, I put e.g., $150 = 102 € , observing the proper position of the sign in each language.)

    __________
    The actual exchange rate as of today, sad to report....
    Strictly speaking, the € sign should be written before the figures (like the £ and the $), but it very often is not:

    http://www.sysmod.com/euro-emu.htm#style
     

    Sush

    Member
    Canada - English
    Merci à tous!

    LMorland, to answer your question about dollar sign placement in Canada, in English it's the same as in the States - $5.00, etc. In French, I've mostly seen it placed after.

    Thanks again!
     

    LMorland

    Senior Member
    American English
    Do you think so ? It does exist on french keyboard (une esperluète) and it's currently used to name societies (have a look here) and in commercial mail.
    That's true we don't use it in novels.
    More on wiki.
    Well, I wrote "in my experience" and it's been my experience that the French don't use the & as we do. My French friends don't use it in textos (where it would be useful) and when I have used the & in a handwritten note, I've been asked, "What's this?".

    So I've ceased to use the & in French. By way of example, if I'm signing off a joint email or a handwritten note to friends in English, I would sign "Laura & John" (my husband), but in French I sign off "Laura et John".
     
    Last edited:
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