Pardon for/about

Dr. JCVRD

Senior Member
Persian
Hello

Is it OK to say "pardon about" or the only preposition for "pardon" is "for"?


"David pardons for his son's attitude."

"David pardons about his son's attitude."

Also any other preposition(s)???


Thank you in advance.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Are you using "pardon" as a verb? If so do not add a preposition:

    David pardons his son's behavior.

    In AE we would use "forgives" instead of "pardons".
     

    Kyle D

    New Member
    English/French (CAN) - bilingual
    It seems to me that you are misusing the verb "to pardon" here.

    You could say "David pardons his son for his attitude", it would imply that his son misbehaved at some point but is now acting properly and therefore David decides to forgive him.
     

    Dr. JCVRD

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It seems to me that you are misusing the verb "to pardon" here.

    You could say "David pardons his son for his attitude", it would imply that his son misbehaved at some point but is now acting properly and therefore David decides to forgive him.
    No! There seems to be a misunderstanding here. I meant David's son has done something wrong or evil to someone (for ex. breaking the window of Lura's house) so David asks Lura for pardon because his son's behavior has been rude.

    How can we use "pardon" as a verb in this context? Or maybe I'd better use "apologize" instead, right?

    1. "David apologizes for his son's attitude."
    2. "David apologizes about his son's attitude."
     

    Dr. JCVRD

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Are you using "pardon" as a verb? If so do not add a preposition:

    David pardons his son's behavior.

    In AE we would use "forgives" instead of "pardons".
    No! There seems to be a misunderstanding here. I meant David's son has done something wrong or evil to someone (for ex. breaking the window of Lura's house) so David asks Lura for pardon because his son's behavior has been rude.

    How can we use "pardon" as a verb in this context? Or maybe I'd better use "apologize" instead, right?

    1. "David apologizes for his son's attitude."
    2. "David apologizes about his son's attitude."
     

    Kyle D

    New Member
    English/French (CAN) - bilingual
    So it'd appear you're confusing the verb "to pardon" which means "to forgive" (which is the verb I'd use instead) with the verb "to apologize".

    Regarding your examples:

    1) Sounds perfectly fine to me.
    2) I'm not sure.
     

    Dr. JCVRD

    Senior Member
    Persian
    So it'd appear you're confusing the verb "to pardon" which means "to forgive" (which is the verb I'd use instead) with the verb "to apologize".

    Regarding your examples:

    1) Sounds perfectly fine to me.
    2) I'm not sure.
    Yes, I think there's a little difference between British English and US English regarding "for" and "about" after "apologize". Some say both are fine. Some only approve "for".

    Thanks a lot.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    David asks Lura for pardon because his son's behavior has been rude.
    How can we use "pardon" as a verb in this context?
    If David's asking Lura (Laura?) to pardon his son, it's Lura who's doing the pardoning. You could say "David asked Lura to pardon his son". "Pardon" is a verb here.
    But you're right in saying that "apologise" fits better here. "Pardon" sounds overly formal in this context.
    "David apologizes about his son's attitude."
    You can be apologetic about something, but I don't think you apologise about something. I'd stick to "for".
     
    Last edited:

    Dr. JCVRD

    Senior Member
    Persian
    If David's asking Lura (Laura?) to pardon his son, it's Lura who's doing the pardoning. You could say "David asked Lura to pardon his son". "Pardon" is a verb here.
    But you're right in saying that "apologise" fits better here. "Pardon" sounds overly formal in this context.

    You can be apologetic about something, but I don't think you apologise about something. I'd stick to "for".
    Thank you.
     
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