Pardon (which) is or Pardon is?

Neostudent

Senior Member
Turkish
Hi guys

Pardon (which) is an action takes place to relinquishment of all or part of punishment

Is It necessary to bring Which Here? if Yes, Why?

Is it Better to say "...to relinquish all .." or "..to relinquishment of all..." Why?

Many Thanks in Advance
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I'm afraid your sentence is a bit difficult to understand, Neostudent. Can you tell us, using other words, what it is you are trying to say? In what context would you say it?
     

    wind-sky-wind

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    There are two types of relative pronouns.

    This is the book which I bought yesterday.
    This "which" can be omitted.

    This is the letter which arrived yesterday.
    This "which" can't be omitted.

    Your "which" is the latter.

    You want to explain the word "pardon," which means "amnesty." Right?

    Pardon is an action WHICH takes place to relinquish all or part of the punishment.

    This might sound awkward or weird, but it will show you how to use relative pronouns.

    This "which" can't be omitted.
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    To put "which" where you have tried to put it, you would need to change the sentence.
    Pardon, which is an action, takes place. Pardon takes place. and as a parenthetical addition: Pardon is an action.
    Pardon is an action which takes place.
     

    Neostudent

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    All Guys Many thanks

    Where can i find some information about these kinds of (can't be omitted) relative Pronouns?
     

    Neostudent

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    thanks wind-sky-wind
    "Omission: As subject of a clause, the relative pronoun can never be omitted. However, the relative clause can be completely omitted:"

    and here what about the place of "which"?

    Pardon (which) is an action (which) takes place.

    where is necessary to come?
     

    wind-sky-wind

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Relative clauses modify the noun preceding the relative pronoun.

    "Pardon is an action" is the main sentence.
    "Which takes place" modifies "an action," not "pardon" itself.

    Ms. White is a teacher (who/whom/that) everyone likes.

    The relative clause modifies a teacher, not Ms. White.
     
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