participal clause help me

Franking

New Member
Korean
Hello,
Please help me on these questions.

1. I opened the bottle and drank it.
A. Opening the bottle, I drank it.
B. I open the bottle, drinking it.
Which one is correct?

2. Although she is not samart, we like her.
A. She not being smart, we like her.
B. She not smart, we like her.
Which one is correct or better?

Thank you for your help in advance.
 
  • S1m0n

    Senior Member
    English
    1. A or B both work.
    2. Neither match the initial statement. A works grammatically, but the meaning changes to 'Because she is not smart, we like her.'
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    None of those alternative versions work.

    1. I opened the bottle and drank it. — even this is illogical, out of context. You can’t drink a bottle!
    A. Opening the bottle, I drank it. — you couldn’t drink while opening the bottle, only afterwards
    B. I open the bottle, drinking it. — same comments apply, and the style is literary (historic present)

    2. Although she is not smart, we like her. :tick:
    A. She not being smart, we like her. :thumbsdown::thumbsdown:
    B. She not smart, we like her. :cross:
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I appreciate that you will have to understand participle phrases when reading some kinds of English literature. But take comfort from the fact that you will never really need to use them in speech, and rarely in writing. All these sentences with participles in #1 sound completely unnatural, and there is always a simpler, and usually a better, way to express the idea.
     

    Franking

    New Member
    Korean
    1. A or B both work.
    2. Neither match the initial statement. A works grammatically, but the meaning changes to 'Because she is not smart, we like her.'
    Thanks for your help.

    A. Not smart, she is mistreated.
    B. Not being smart, she is mistreated.
    I thought A is correct, too. Is only B acceptable?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    A. is not a participle clause and not an acceptable construction anyway. It could only be short for 'She's not smart!' It can't be followed directly by another clause (sentence), ' ... she is mistreated.'
    A. is not correct.

    B. has a participle phrase replacing a clause such as "because she isn't smart ...". This can be followed by a sentence ' ... she's mistreated.' This is correct.
     

    Franking

    New Member
    Korean
    A. is not a participle clause and not an acceptable construction anyway. It could only be short for 'She's not smart!' It can't be followed directly by another clause (sentence), ' ... she is mistreated.'
    A. is not correct.

    B. has a participle phrase replacing a clause such as "because she isn't smart ...". This can be followed by a sentence ' ... she's mistreated.' This is correct.
    I appreciate your help.

    A. Being pushed, she was angry.
    B. Pushed, she was angry.

    How should passive mood be expressed?
    Can being be omitted?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'After being pushed she felt angry.'' or 'She felt angry after being pushed.' 'Having been pushed ... ' is a possibility but it is unnecessary and even more awkward.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think if anyone did have occasion to say that, they’d probably express it as “She was angry at being pushed” (or “having been”).
     

    billj

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thanks for your help.

    A. Not smart, she is mistreated.
    B. Not being smart, Kim is mistreated.
    I thought A is correct, too. Is only B acceptable?
    Syntactically, these are both acceptable.

    In A, the adjective phrase "not smart" is a predicative adjunct: predicative because it is related to a predicand, in this case "Kim", and an adjunct because it functions as a supplement in clause structure.

    Predicative adjuncts are not restricted to adjective phrases; they can also be preposition phrases, as in In a bad temper, as usual, John walked on ahead of the main party. And noun phrases too, as in A proud teetotaller, John stuck to water while the others drank champagne.

    In B. the gerund-participial clause "not being smart" is supplementary adjunct, though not predicative. It has no subject, but is syntactically related to the main clause in that the subject is controlled by the subject of the main clause: It was Kim who was not smart.
     

    Franking

    New Member
    Korean
    Syntactically, these are both acceptable.

    In A, the adjective phrase "not smart" is a predicative adjunct: predicative because it is related to a predicand, in this case "Kim", and an adjunct because it functions as a supplement in clause structure.

    Predicative adjuncts are not restricted to adjective phrases; they can also be preposition phrases, as in In a bad temper, as usual, John walked on ahead of the main party. And noun phrases too, as in A proud teetotaller, John stuck to water while the others drank champagne.

    In B. the gerund-participial clause "not being smart" is supplementary adjunct, though not predicative. It has no subject, but is syntactically related to the main clause in that the subject is controlled by the subject of the main clause: It was Kim who was not smart.
    Hi billj,
    Thank you for help.
    Can you help me on another issue?

    The train left Seoul at 5 and arrived here at 8.

    If I change it into participle clauses,
    1. Leaving Seoul at 5, the train arrived here at 8.
    2. The train left Seoul at 5, arriving here at 8.

    Which one is better to describe the sequential?
    Are both correct?
    Thanks again.
     
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