Participle adjective -unsuspecting deer

< Previous | Next >

firee818

Senior Member
Chinese
When we say unsuspecting deer, unsuspecting is a participle adjective. Is this a kind of compound noun? Could we replace it with unsuspected deer.

E.g. When an unsuspecting/unsuspected deer comes to the river to drink...

Present participle if we use as an adjective (unsuspecting), it has an effect on others while the past participle(unsuspected) is influenced by others. How do we use these concepts to explain the above example?

Thank you.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The -ing form is active: the deer is unsuspecting = the deer does not suspect anything. The -ed form (when used in this situation) is passive: the deer is unsuspected = the deer is unsuspected by anyone = nobody suspects the deer (nobody suspects there to be a deer here). I think that's a clearer way of understanding it than 'effect' and 'influence'.
     

    firee818

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The -ing form is active: the deer is unsuspecting = the deer does not suspect anything. The -ed form (when used in this situation) is passive: the deer is unsuspected = the deer is unsuspected by anyone = nobody suspects the deer (nobody suspects there to be a deer here). I think that's a clearer way of understanding it than 'effect' and 'influence'.
    Very good explanation, it has cleared my doubt.

    Thank you very much.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top