Particles, Stressed and Unstressed (Grammar)

Randisi.

Senior Member
American English; USA
Hello, everyone.

I have a general question about the use of particles.

When consulting my Duden, I often read that a certain sense of a particle is either betont or unbetont, stressed or unstressed. Does this mean anything for written German, or is it really only relevant for spoken German (or perhaps italicized written German)?

I can't seem to find the answer to this anywhere, so I entrust myself to the wisdom of the Forum.

Thanks.

Ciao!
 
  • Cpt.Eureka

    Senior Member
    German
    Hi,

    it's quite usual to mark stressed words (even parts of words) in private letters or in books, but very rare in "official" or business correspondence.
     

    Alemanita

    Senior Member
    German, Germany
    Hello, everyone.

    I have a general question about the use of particles.

    When consulting my Duden, I often read that a certain sense of a particle is either betont or unbetont, stressed or unstressed. Does this mean anything for written German, or is it really only relevant for spoken German (or perhaps italicized written German)?

    I can't seem to find the answer to this anywhere, so I entrust myself to the wisdom of the Forum.

    Thanks.

    Ciao!
    It is relevant insofar as stressed particles separate from the verb when conjugated:
    ab'fahren: ich fahre ab.
    Unter'gehen : ich gehe unter.
    Unterschei'den: ich unterscheide.
     

    Derselbe

    Senior Member
    Deutsch, German, ドイツ語
    Don't you think that you are missing the point? Randisi didn't want to know how to stress words in written documents. Rather he asked whether stressing a particle could result in a change of sense. At least that is my understanding of his questions. To further examine this we would need an example sentence. An example that came to my mind is:

    Ich gehe doch ins Kino.

    Here, the particle doch has different meanings depending on whether it is stressed or not. If unmarked it means "as I told you before". If marked it means "contrary to prior information". I think this is what Randise read about in the Duden. Then again, to be sure we need a confirmation here.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    ...

    When consulting my Duden, I often read that a certain sense of a particle is either betont or unbetont, stressed or unstressed. Does this mean anything for written German, or is it really only relevant for spoken German (or perhaps italicized written German)?

    ...
    Usually in written text this is not marked. If you want to be precise it can mean that you have to use other words, that you have tor rephrase it. But as others mentioned aboth, you also can clarifying by marking it.
    This way it is relevant as well for written as for spoken language.

    Ich gehe doch ins Kino. - if "doch" is unstressed, it can also mean "... and not anywhere else!"

    You have to consider such things definitely when writing.
     

    Randisi.

    Senior Member
    American English; USA
    I understand now.

    I was merely wondering if somehow the position of the word in the written sentence would make it stressed or unstressed (for instance at the beginning of a clause).

    Thanks, everyone.
     
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