partiture e parti staccate

PUDDY

New Member
English UK
Translating a CV of a musician, "partiture" would seem to mean musical arrangement arrangement but I do not understand the meaning of "parti staccate". Does this mean separate musical partitions for different instruments?
Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Puddy
 
  • AlabamaBoy

    Senior Member
    American English
    So, it sounds like the arrangement is separated out into parts for individual instruments, rather than all being on the same page, such as would be the case for the conductor. Can anyone confirm this?
     

    PUDDY

    New Member
    English UK
    Many thanks for your useful suggestions - yes scores is right for "partiture" and I guess "parti" are parts for individual instruments. I have however a suspicion that "partiture" is used for piano score and "parti staccate" means scores for other instruments, i.e. the correct word is musical "score" and not "part".
    Puddy
     

    elfa

    Senior Member
    English
    So, it sounds like the arrangement is separated out into parts for individual instruments, rather than all being on the same page, such as would be the case for the conductor. Can anyone confirm this?

    This is definitely "parts" and not "scores". "Scores" are the arrangements of several "parts" put together.

    I would translate "parti staccate" as "individual parts" to distinguish it from the "score". If the "score" is for piano only, this could be also be called the "piano score".
     
    Last edited:

    panzona

    Senior Member
    So, it sounds like the arrangement is separated out into parts for individual instruments, rather than all being on the same page, such as would be the case for the conductor. Can anyone confirm this?

    Yes!

    parti staccate are the "piece of sheet music" (just to avoid any misunderstanding :D) for one single instrument, the ones that are used in orchestras (or trios, quartets and so on) by each person playing, while the partitura is the "piece of sheet music" that contains all the parts, aligned vertically.

    Normally, parti staccate = parts, partitura = score.

    Many thanks for your useful suggestions - yes scores is right for "partiture" and I guess "parti" are parts for individual instruments. I have however a suspicion that "partiture" is used for piano score and "parti staccate" means scores for other instruments, i.e. the correct word is musical "score" and not "part".
    Puddy

    As Elfa already suggested, you can use score also for a piece of sheet music which is originally written for one instrument only (piano, violin, cello...), but when a 'group' is involved the score is the one with all the parts together...
    Hope it helps!
    :)
     

    Tonza

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Sorry for the late response, but in addition to the other comments I wanted to clarify the term "piano score". This is the term often used to describe the "reduction" of a full orchestral score, that is, an arrangement of the many original instrumental parts into only the two staves played on a piano. It is used for example in ballet and opera rehearsals, prior to the rehearsals with full orchestra, so that one pianist can cheaply and efficiently accompany the dancers or singers. It is still called a "score" even though it is only one piano part because it contains all of the essential material in the original score, often with labels to indicate which instrument plays a particular passage. Additionally, when a piano is one of the instruments in a chamber ensemble, the piano part is traditionally published with all the other instrumental parts written on the same page in score form, so that it really is a "piano score" because it is the score of the whole piece as well as the part that the pianist performs from. (Other instrumental parts are published separately, as discussed above, and are genuinely "parts".)
     
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