Parts of the human head

  • JB

    Senior Member
    English (AE)
    This is a new thread/file for me. I presume anyone can add, right?
    I added Spanish entries for Chin, Cheek and Nostrils.

    Re some of the comments below, I know there are different usages in different areas. In L.A. medical interpreting, if I say "amígdalas" for "tonsils" (the correct term) no one knows the word; the slang "anginas" is universally understood (by the people I translate for). "Cintura" which means "waist" is used for "low back" by those from Mexico. But I also ran into someone from C.A. using the same term, which I expect comes from the mixtures of languages (including Spanlish) that takes place in So. Calif.

    I once had a deposition (declaración jurada) about a back injury from a car accident. When the lawyer used the term "back" I translated as "espalda," and when she said "low back" I said "cintura", since this is what the deponent (la persona de El Salvador) had previously used. Naturally, his answers seemed contradicory: "I have low back pain every day" and "I have no back pain." I made a suggestion to the attorney, and things got clarified.

    QUESTION: Do the other "foreros" want slang and colloquial terms in this list, or just proper? For me it would be helpful, to get as many as I can, so that if someone says "me duele el cerebro del coco" I know that he's talking about the occipital area (lower back part ) of his head, and not his cocoanut's brain.
    Should I add these to the list?
     

    belén

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain, Catalan, Mallorca
    jbruceismay said:
    This is a new thread/file for me. I presume anyone can add, right?
    I added Spanish entries for Chin, Cheek and Nostrils.

    Re some of the comments below, I know there are different usages in different areas. In L.A. medical interpreting, if I say "amígdalas" for "tonsils" (the correct term) no one knows the word; the slang "anginas" is universally understood (by the people I translate for). "Cintura" which means "waist" is used for "low back" by those from Mexico. But I also ran into someone from C.A. using the same term, which I expect comes from the mixtures of languages (including Spanlish) that takes place in So. Calif.

    I once had a deposition (declaración jurada) about a back injury from a car accident. When the lawyer used the term "back" I translated as "espalda," and when she said "low back" I said "cintura", since this is what the deponent (la persona de El Salvador) had previously used. Naturally, his answers seemed contradicory: "I have low back pain every day" and "I have no back pain." I made a suggestion to the attorney, and things got clarified.

    QUESTION: Do the other "foreros" want slang and colloquial terms in this list, or just proper? For me it would be helpful, to get as many as I can, so that if someone says "me duele el cerebro del coco" I know that he's talking about the occipital area (lower back part ) of his head, and not his cocoanut's brain.
    Should I add these to the list?

    Hi, please remember to add the document to your post :)

    Thanks,

    Belén
     

    JB

    Senior Member
    English (AE)
    Estimada Belén:

    Me encanta la sabiduría de Mafalda.

    No entiendo Add the document to your post. ¿lo puede decir en otras palabras, o en inglés?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    jbruceismay said:
    Estimada Belén:

    Me encanta la sabiduría de Mafalda.

    No entiendo Add the document to your post. ¿lo puede decir en otras palabras, o en inglés?

    I think she meant attach the updated file (with your contributions) to your post. Read this sticky for more information on how this forum works.
     

    Bartold

    Banned
    Polska - Polish
    I added some Polish and some English words. The English ones need definitions. Maybe a native could do this? ;)
     

    Attachments

    • parts of the human head-PL.xls
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    Bartold

    Banned
    Polska - Polish
    Inara said:
    Hi!

    Whodunit: in Russian "sidebirns" are called Бакенбард/ы [Bakenbard/y] which I believed was borrowed from German or Dutch. I thought "baken" could stand for "side" and "bard" for "beard". However in German version there is another word.
    I am just curious if this Russian word sounds anything to you or to other German or Dutch-speaking people.
    Thanks
    In Polish there are "bokobrody". It means "hair on the sides of the beard". And "bok" means "side" and "broda" means "beard". There's also a shorter form "baki".
    There's also something called "pejsy" these are long hair of Jewish Othodox men in front of the ears. What are the equivalents to it in other languages?
     
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