Party is over when the fat lady sings

< Previous | Next >

Vampiro

Member Emeritus
Chile - Español
Alguien conoce el origen y el significado exacto de la expresión "Party is over when the fat lady sings" ?
Me refiero al sentido que tiene, no a la traducción, que es muy obvia.
Muchas gracias de antemano.
Saludos.
 
  • alacant

    Senior Member
    England, english
    The show isn´t over ´til the fat lady sings.

    This is original. I think it comes from circuses in EEUU, but I am sure a native will tell us more.

    Saludos
     

    Vampiro

    Member Emeritus
    Chile - Español
    Encontré esto en la red, por lo tanto me contesto a mi mismo: oye, mismo, acá tienes la respuesta.
    (la adjunto sólo porque puede resultar interesante para alguien)
    Saludos.

    Great Horned Songbird.
    Dear Word Detective: Where did the expression "It's not over until the fat lady sings" come from? -- Steve Markley.
    Good question, which, in the word-origins business, is short for "Good luck finding a definitive answer to that question." What we do know about "It's not over until the fat lady sings" is that it is an American catch-phrase meaning that victory (or defeat) is not certain until the contest is absolutely finished. As advice not to regard any half-baked situation as a done deal, "It's not over until the fat lady sings" is roughly equivalent to the venerable "Don't count your chickens until they're hatched" and very similar to Yogi Berra's famous 1973 dictum that "It ain't over till it's over." Despite the similarity, however, there is no evidence tying "It's not over until the fat lady sings" to Yogi.
    There seems to be a strong likelihood that "It's not over until the fat lady sings" began as a reference to opera, especially the sort of Wagnerian epic that involves large women wearing helmets with horns. It is entirely possible, as has been suggested, that "It's not over until the fat lady sings" is the punch line to a long-lost joke that involved one or more unsophisticated patrons mistaking intermission for the end of the show and being informed on their way out, perhaps by an usher, that "The opera's not over until the fat lady sings." On the other hand, a pamphlet entitled "Southern Words and Sayings" published in 1976 contains the phrase "Church ain't out till the fat lady sings," so it's possible that church, not opera, was the original inspiration.
    If we put the actual origin of the phrase aside for a moment and focus on how "It's not over until the fat lady sings" became popular, life suddenly becomes much easier. A sportswriter for the San Antonio Express-News named Dan Cook used the phrase in his column in 1976 and in TV commentary two years later to buck up fans of the San Antonio Spurs basketball team, then locked in the playoffs with the Washington Bullets. Bullets coach Dick Motta adopted the phrase as his own, and by the end of the playoffs (which the Bullets won) "It's not over until the fat lady sings" was known all over America.


    Alacant, gracias por tu aporte también.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top