pas farouche pour un liard

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valy822

Senior Member
Italy- Italian
hallo, j'ai une question à vous poser: "marie etait jolie et pas farouche pour un liard!" qu'est-ce que la part suolignée signifie? Merci
 
  • Auryn

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Caronium said:
    "farouche" is the complete opposite of "shy"
    I think you meant "pas farouche", Auryn :)
    No, 'farouche' does mean shy or fierce. It's often used to describe wildlife (une biche farouche) or a fierce warrior (un guerrier farouche). Therefore 'pas farouche' means 'not shy', or here 'easy' :)

    I realise that my initial post was confusing though, I should have said "when applied to a girl, 'pas farouche' means she's not exactly a prude".
     

    le chat noir

    Senior Member
    French
    a "liard" was some ancient coin of very small value. Some expressions still use it as a mean of comparison, but it's very uncommon.
    "pas farouche pour un liard" could translate to something like "not a penny's worth of shyness [toward men]".
     

    RODGER

    Senior Member
    UK ENGLISH
    Why should not being shy make her "easy" ? (une fille facile") You could say "forthcoming" "pert" "vivacious" "outgoing" "uninhibited" .....
     

    Jabote

    Senior Member
    French from France
    When someone says "elle n'est pas farouche" about a girl, it is usually said with a smirk. It is a sarcasm to mean that she is the exact opposite, she is ready for any man who will want her. The next step is "elle a le feu aux fesses"
     

    Caronium

    Member
    Canada - French ~ English
    Auryn said:
    'farouche' does mean shy or fierce. It's often used to describe wildlife (une biche farouche) or a fierce warrior (un guerrier farouche). Therefore 'pas farouche' means 'not shy', or here 'easy' :)
    Auryn said:
    "when applied to a girl, 'pas farouche' means she's not exactly a prude".
    Isn't "shy" the opposite of "fierce"...? I thought "to be shy" meant "to be insecure/timid". :eek:
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Auryn said:
    No, 'farouche' does mean shy or fierce. It's often used to describe wildlife (une biche farouche) or a fierce warrior (un guerrier farouche). Therefore 'pas farouche' means 'not shy', or here 'easy' :)

    I realise that my initial post was confusing though, I should have said "when applied to a girl, 'pas farouche' means she's not exactly a prude".
    It can mean both "shy" and "wild"? They seem almost like opposites, how confusing. I have come across "farouche" meaning wild, but not shy before. Do you mean it is only used in the phrase "pas farouche" which means not shy because you are being sarcastic and saying the opposite of what you mean? Or could you say "elle est farouche" and it would mean "she is the shy type"?
     

    RODGER

    Senior Member
    UK ENGLISH
    timpeac said:
    It can mean both "shy" and "wild"? They seem almost like opposites, how confusing. I have come across "farouche" meaning wild, but not shy before. Do you mean it is only used in the phrase "pas farouche" which means not shy because you are being sarcastic and saying the opposite of what you mean? Or could you say "elle est farouche" and it would mean "she is the shy type"?
    "farouche" talking of a man for example, just to change the gender for once, means someone "uncouth" "unmannered" and probably, because he realises this, when in society, he feels awkward and therefore appears "shy" - get it ?

    Rodger
     

    fetchezlavache

    Senior Member
    france
    yes, for instance you can say that of a doe, une biche est un animal farouche, as in very wary and cautious and easily scared.

    and you can say that of a fierce animal (thank you john cleese/kevin kline), for instance an aggressive goose (but aren't they all) cette oie était particulièrement farouche.

    or, with humans 'il a opposé une farouche résistance'.

    i agree it's confusing. rest assured that the first meaning (shy) is the most common.
     

    fetchezlavache

    Senior Member
    france
    RODGER said:
    "farouche" talking of a man for example, just to change the gender for once, means someone "uncouth" "unmannered" and probably, because he realises this, when in society, he feels awkward and therefore appears "shy" - get it ?

    Rodger

    this is not correct. the word has both meanings, and there is nothing going on like what you describe, an outspoken manner being all of a sudden transformed into a shy outlook. (in the eye of the beholder at that) :eek:
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    So judging from what Rodger and Fetchez say it is "shy" in the sense of "ill at ease socially" rather than "demure" then when you use it of people?
     

    sophievm

    Senior Member
    France - français
    Tiré du Dictionnaire de l'Académie française, neuvième édition :

    FAROUCHE adj. XIIIe siècle, forasche. Issu du bas latin forasticus, « extérieur, étranger », puis « sauvage ».
    I. En parlant des animaux. Qui s'enfuit quand on l'approche ; sauvage. Apprivoiser une bête farouche.

    II. En parlant des personnes. 1. Qui se tient à l'écart des autres ; qui se montre peu sociable. Un homme solitaire et farouche. Un enfant farouche. Expr. fam. Une jeune femme peu farouche, qui se laisse volontiers séduire. 2. Rude, brutal, cruel. Un farouche adversaire. Un farouche guerrier. Des populations farouches. 3. Qui exprime la dureté, la violence, l'hostilité.

    III. En parlant d'une région, d'un site. Hostile, dangereux. Une contrée inhospitalière et farouche. Une côte farouche.
     

    RODGER

    Senior Member
    UK ENGLISH
    Thanks sophievm, your post shows that the term "wild" in English has the meaning of I, none of II, and all of III, but it has another which we could translate as "fou furieux" or something like that !

    Rodger
     

    mezzosopranodeparis

    New Member
    English - American
    Re: marie etait jolie et pas farouche pour un liard!
    Thank you for this discussion. I am reading Beckett's Fin de partie and came to this site to look up the meaning of just this phrase, which is obviously from this play.
    (p. 61 of Les Editions de Minuit)
     
    Last edited:

    mezzosopranodeparis

    New Member
    English - American
    I have just looked up Beckett's English translation of his own play. For the phrase in question, he translates thusly: "And a great one for the men!" (p. 121, Samuel Beckett, Dramatic Works, vol. III, Grove Press.
     

    sylvainremy

    Senior Member
    French
    To continue spinning an old thread, it's easier to understand how farouche can have apparently 2 opposite meanings (btw not so rare in both French and English) if you think of it as 'unapproachable', ie the subject will avoid contact if it can but resist fiercely if backed up, which is how a girl is or was expected to protect her virtue :). (I love long sentences.)
     

    Corky Ringspot

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "farouche" talking of a man for example, just to change the gender for once, means someone "uncouth" "unmannered" and probably, because he realises this, when in society, he feels awkward and therefore appears "shy" - get it ?

    Rodger
    "ill-mannered", not "unmannered". "unmannered" doesn't exist in the English language.
     

    Corky Ringspot

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Isn't "shy" the opposite of "fierce"...? I thought "to be shy" meant "to be insecure/timid". :eek:
    The point is that timidity is an ingredient of fierceness; an animal that isn't timid shows no fear and therefore doesn't feel a need to defend itself by being fierce. An animal that lacks timidity is tame and shows no fierceness! Therefore timidity, by extension, means fierceness.
     
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