Pasante

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dimarzomayra

Member
Spanish
Can you help me to translate this word "pasante"?

We call "pasante" to student that has work in a company for his will be a graduate.

Thank you very much...
 
  • VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    dimarzomayra said:
    Can you help me to translate this word "pasante"?

    We call "pasante" to student that has work in a company for his will be a graduate.
    ¿Puedes explicar qué significa la palabra en español? No lo entendí bien en inglés . . .

    EDIT: Espero que este hilo te ayude.
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    This is interesting. The word appears in neither my Collins Spanish dictionary nor in the WordReference dictionary.

    Is this word a new word, or only used in a certain region?
     

    Txiri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    No, it´s not new. Some dictionaries just don´t have every word ...´

    I had a Collins a long time ago, and didn´t find it to be a good dictionary. I hope yours is better!
     

    esuteban

    Senior Member
    español, chile
    Can you help me to translate this word "pasante"?

    We call "pasante" to student that has work in a company for his will be a graduate.

    Thank you very much...
    if you mean a student who works in order to be graduate, it is "practica profesional", the action of being working "practica"
     

    Lusobe

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    Os copio la definición del Maria Moliner (la definición de la que se habla en esta línea del foro, debe corresponder con la tercera):
    pasante
    1
    adj. Aplicable al que pasa.
    2 Heráld. Se aplica al animal representado en actitud de andar.
    3 m. En la profesión de *abogado, y antes también en la de médico, auxiliar que trabaja con uno ya experto para adquirir práctica.
    4 *Profesor que repasa las lecciones a los estudiantes o les ayuda a aprenderlas. ¤ Profesor que hacía una labor semejante dentro de una facultad.
    5 En algunas *órdenes, religioso estudiante que se prepara para la enseñanza o para el púlpito.
    Pasante de pluma. Pasante de *abogado.
     

    Juan Carlos Garling

    Senior Member
    Spanish Chile/Argentina
    To anyone who happens upon this thread looking for a translation for "pasante," the English word in question is "intern."
    I agree but wish to add that in this context (pasante), 'intern' refers to the recently graduated physician (sometimes short before graduation) who is acquaring practice in a hospital (sometimes unpaid) for some time. This is, at least in Chile, 'un interno'. The term may have derived from the fact that he is practically living at the hospital, without yet a privat consulting room.
     

    JaneJ

    Senior Member
    MEXICO
    Pasante aplica a cualquier egresado de una carrera (licenciatura) que no se ha titulado aún.
    Pasante de ingeniero, pasante de médico, etc.

    Pero el término en inglés (intern) no me parece del todo correcto... pero tampoco sé cual otro puede ser mejor... Tal vez candidate?

    Saludos,
    JaneJ
     

    zumac

    Senior Member
    USA: English & Spanish
    Can you help me to translate this word "pasante"?

    We call "pasante" to student that has work in a company for his will be a graduate.

    Thank you very much...
    In the USA, there is is no term like "pasante", because the condition of a college or university graduate without a degree, does not exist. If a student finished and passed the required courses, he is automatically entitled to a degree, period.

    The practice of some countries that forces college/university undergraduates to write a thesis, present a "professional examination", or submit to a costly "final examination" in order to be issued a degree, is highly discriminatory and immoral. As I write this, I know of a college graduate here in Mexico who cannot afford the US$2,000 required for this examination. As a result, she will continue to work as a "pasante."

    This practice should be outlawed. An alarming number of college graduates are working in companies for drastically reduced salaries and low level jobs because they cannot afford the money to get their degrees. The companies, in turn, benefit from this practice.

    In summary, "pasante" could loosely be translated into English as:
    "a college/university graduate without a degree."

    Saludos.
     

    Semjase

    Member
    Spanish
    The situation here is that por example here in Mexico City "pasante" is someone who has already finished but to titled...

    So... if there is not a word in English for that the use of Intern would be fine..
     

    Txiri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In the USA, there is is no term like "pasante", because the condition of a college or university graduate without a degree, does not exist. ....

    ....
    I will only comment that some academic careers, such as school counseling, under the rubrics of departments of psychology, DO require their prospective graduate students to complete a practicum, which is also sometimes called an internship.

    It is similar enough to medical internships. Graduates-to-be work professionally under the guidance and tutelage of professionals on the job. (They aren´t paid as much, if they are indeed paid ...)
     

    Juan Carlos Garling

    Senior Member
    Spanish Chile/Argentina
    I will only comment that some academic careers, such as school counseling, under the rubrics of departments of psychology, DO require their prospective graduate students to complete a practicum, which is also sometimes called an internship.

    It is similar enough to medical internships. Graduates-to-be work professionally under the guidance and tutelage of professionals on the job. (They aren´t paid as much, if they are indeed paid ...)
    practicum is a good interpretation of pasantía

    internship serves well for medical students

     

    emaestro

    Senior Member
    English - USA Native
    I agree but wish to add that in this context (pasante), 'intern' refers to the recently graduated physician (sometimes short before graduation) who is acquiring practice in a hospital (sometimes unpaid) for some time. This is, at least in Chile, 'un interno'. The term may have derived from the fact that he is practically living at the hospital, without yet a private consulting room.
    What Juan Carlos is referring to here sounds like a medical Residency.

    Look at these two links.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resident_%28medicine%29


    http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9806E2DF1230F93BA35756C0A9649C8B63

    I can’t believe I am the first to mention the term “Medical Resident” in this discussion!
     

    zumac

    Senior Member
    USA: English & Spanish
    practicum is a good interpretation of pasantía

    internship serves well for medical students
    Juan Carlos,

    The "short period of practice = una pasantía" or a type of internship does occur in the USA only for a minority of professions like medicine and law. But for the vast majority of undergraduate college degrees this interim period or situation does not exist. When the student has successfully completed all the required courses and related examinations, he is graduated and given his degree.

    In Mexico however, the vast majority of undergradute students that do not require a formal "pasantia" or an internship, are not awarded their degrees upon completion of the required courses and related examinations. They are considered to be in the category of "pasante" until they present a thesis or pay for a special final examination. After either event, they must then go before a special board of professors who will decide if they are eligible to be granted their degree. For this majority of students, there are no actual "pasantia" or internship requirements of any kind. They may choose to work being considered as a¨"pasante", develop their thesis, or study for the special final examination.

    It is this Mexican term of "pasante" which does not have an equivalent whatsoever in the United States educational system.

    No le busquemos tres pies al gato.

    Saludos.
     

    Juan Carlos Garling

    Senior Member
    Spanish Chile/Argentina
    Juan Carlos,

    The "short period of practice = una pasantía" or a type of internship does occur in the USA only for a minority of professions like medicine and law. But for the vast majority of undergraduate college degrees this interim period or situation does not exist. When the student has successfully completed all the required courses and related examinations, he is graduated and given his degree.

    In Mexico however, the vast majority of undergradute students that do not require a formal "pasantia" or an internship, are not awarded their degrees upon completion of the required courses and related examinations. They are considered to be in the category of "pasante" until they present a thesis or pay for a special final examination. After either event, they must then go before a special board of professors who will decide if they are eligible to be granted their degree. For this majority of students, there are no actual "pasantia" or internship requirements of any kind. They may choose to work being considered as a¨"pasante", develop their thesis, or study for the special final examination.

    It is this Mexican term of "pasante" which does not have an equivalent whatsoever in the United States educational system.

    No le busquemos tres pies al gato.

    Saludos.
    No estamos buscando cinco patas al gato (que no las hay pero hay gatos con tres patas si le amputaron una) sino que utilizamos el foro para vertir opiniones de las cuales el/la consultante podrá decidir por aquella que mejor acomode a su necesidad de traducción.

    Tus observaciones son totalmente acertadas, en especial cuando mencionas que la pasantía generalmente está vinculada con la tesis que ha elegido el estudiante. Mis alcances estaban parcialmente basadas en el hecho de que oportunamente hospedé en mi casa un estudiante alemán de ciencias políticas que en su condición de pasante (ein Passant) había elegido pasar un tiempo en Sudamérica conociendo su entorno social y político precisamente porque la tesis que estaba preparando se refería a este continente. Esta experiencia era debidamente reconocida como parte complementaria obligatoria de su tesis por las autoridades académicas. Podemos definirla como una experiencia en terreno = field experience.

    Podemos concluir que la aceptación de pasante/pasantía puede ser flexible según en qué campo, contexto o país se aplique. En algunas partes, aunque simplemente simbólico (pues generalmente no es mucho lo que agregan a sus conocimientos), es prerrequisto junto con la tesis para la titulación.

    El hecho de que estudiantes aún no graduados (por el costo de su presentación a examen) trabajen por mayor tiempo en alguna empresa como pasantes sin merecer el sueldo justo (tal como se manifiesta en algunos mensajes) es por cierto un abuso condenable.
     

    zumac

    Senior Member
    USA: English & Spanish
    Estimado Juan Carlos:

    Estoy completamente de acuerdo con tu siguiente conclusión:

    "Podemos concluir que la aceptación de pasante/pasantía puede ser flexible según en qué campo, contexto o país se aplique."

    Nuestro colega Dimarzomayra nos hizo caer en varias trampas.
    1) No declaró a que idioma quería la traducción. Dado este foro, se supone que sería al inglés, pero, ¿para el inglés y normas educativas de qué país?
    2) No declaró de que país tomaba la palabra "pasante".

    Entonces, cada quien de nosotros lo tomó para el inglés y país que conocía, y para el pais donde conocia el uso de "pasante."

    Yo en lo particular me enfoqué en el ingles de USA y sus normas educativas, y en la palabra "pasante" según se usa en México. Obviamente algunos colegas no estuvieron de acuerdo conmigo.

    Gracias por tus aportaciones, Juan Carlos.

    Saludos.
     

    flor de guik

    Senior Member
    españa, español
    en españa por ejemplo los licenciados en derecho suelen hacer una pasantia, trabar como pasantes, hacer practicas en un despaho, ser un becario.... etc antes de incorporarse propiamente al mercado laboral.

    todo lo citado anteriormente son sinonimos y ya han acabado sus estudios. En inglaterra he oido los terminos internship y training or trainee
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    I'd like to point out that for advanced degrees in the U.S., you are required to write a thesis (master's degree) or dissertation (doctorate) and also sit an oral exam for a doctorate. The academic slang term for someone who has completed all the coursework for a Ph.D. but has not finished their dissertation is an ABD (all but dissertation). And with the cost of tuition here, $2,000 sounds like a bargain!
     

    Juan Carlos Garling

    Senior Member
    Spanish Chile/Argentina
    Can you help me to translate this word "pasante"?

    We call "pasante" to student that has work in a company for his will be a graduate.

    Thank you very much...
    Perhaps you could have used trainee.

    This is what Monica Lewinski was when working with Bill Clinton in the White House without pay, though with other amenities.
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Monica Lewinsky was referred to as an intern. A trainee is someone who is being paid to learn a job, or at least is being trained for a specific job that they then will be paid to do.
     

    marza

    Senior Member
    Mexico, español
    I have the same problem regarding a CV. May be it will be useful to someone else:

    UNDERGRADUATE: n. A college or university student who has not yet received a bachelor's or similar degree.

    Saludos!
     
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