Pass a parking car or something blocking your way

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  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    :confused:It depends how wide the road is ... or whether it's possible to pass it by driving along the pavement for a bit.
     

    tomtombp

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    to pass it by driving along the pavement for a bit.
    That's it! You used pass it in the above sentence. This was exactly my question. Is pass and go round interchangeable in this case? I know you pass/overtake moving vehicles, but what do you do with non-moving ones? First you stop and let the cars coming towards you in the free lane leave and then you go round the car parking in your lane?

    << Second question needs its own thread. :) >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    What do you do with non-moving objects blocking your way on the road?
    Pass/divert them?
    As you have already deduced we pass stationary vehicles. We can only divert something (traffic, water, air, a crowd...) which is moving/flowing and then it is not we (people driving/moving with the flow) who divert them but other people, usually police officers or road workers, who divert us.

    Instead of the verb divert we can use the noun form thus:

    The road is blocked so I will take a diversion.

    But a diversion (or detour) means taking a different route altogether rather than passing an obstacle on your chosen route.
     

    tomtombp

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    The way of using divert is now clear to me thanks to Aardvark01.
    However ewie keeps me confused about pass/go round:

    Yes, I'd wait patiently :)rolleyes:) and then go round it:thumbsup:

    EDIT: I might talk about passing an obstacle but not about passing a car (in these particular circumstances.)
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    :confused:It depends how wide the road is ... or whether it's possible to pass it by driving along the pavement for a bit.
    I think the reason I'm being confusing (apart from my usual habit of being confusing) is that in the above I was thinking about 'an obstacle' rather than 'a car that's parked in my path'.
     
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