pass over

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
In a traffic jam, Ashlie and Stephen are caught by hail:
- Hail never lasts long. I’m sure it will pass over.
BBC video

What meaning of the phrasal verb is employeed here? Or is it a verb+adverb?
Thanks.
 
  • VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    But what did he want to say then?:confused: That the hail is not for ever? But that's obvious.
    I'd expect in this case it to be:
    I’m sure it will pass over soon.
    Or did I misunderstand something?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The storm is moving east to west above us. The storm will move from not being over us in the east, to being over us, to being over us to the west. The storm will pass us while being above us.
    The faster car will pass beside us in the other lane. The fast car is behind us, it will be beside us, then it will be in front of us.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    All weather systems move, but some move quickly and some move slowly. Do you see dark clouds on the horizon? That means rain! Maybe the rain will settle in and it will rain all day. Or maybe the rain will pass over and the clouds will move off quickly; if so it will not rain here, or it will rain only briefly.

    If it was hailing, you wouldn't want to go outside it in! But hail storms are usually brief. You'll just have to wait a bit before you carry on with your plans.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    The storm is moving east to west above us. The storm will move from not being over us in the east, to being over us, to being over us to the west. The storm will pass us while being above us.
    The faster car will pass beside us in the other lane. The fast car is behind us, it will be beside us, then it will be in front of us.
    In other words, he claims that the storm is not going to stop in passing and hang over them. It'll pass anyway. Am I right?

    cross-posted with Sparky
     
    "soon" is implied, Vik. I'm sure you can see that. Hence it's not entirely obvious; but even if it is, sometimes people say obvious things, (when you're hurt) "You'll live."


    But what did he want to say then?:confused: That the hail is not for ever? But that's obvious.
    I'd expect in this case it to be:
    I’m sure it will pass over soon.
    Or did I misunderstand something?
     
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