pass over

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
During an exorcism being done to Janet to get the spirit off her, the spirit, using his telekinetic power, brings the urn with his ashes up to the ceiling. At some point it blows up there with the ashes scattering all over the room and the people there. Playfair, the one who performed the exorcism, says:
-- Joe Watson [the spirit] has passed over.
-- [Grosse to Janet] How do you feel?
-- [Janet] A bit funny. Yeah, lighter.
The Enfield Haunting, TV series

I couldn't find "pass over" as an intransitive verb. I guess it has the meaning "is gone" here, but is "pass over" usually used like that? Thank you.
 
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I couldn't find "pass over" as an intransitive verb. I guess it has the meaning "is gone" here, but is "pass over" usually used like that? Thank you.
    I think it's mostly limited to those who believe in communication with the spirit world. It's short for "pass over to the other side," the "other side" being the spirit realm.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I think we use "passed away" more than "pass over" see this from the freedictionary.com :
    pass away
    Also, pass on or over . Die, as in He passed away last week, or After Grandma passes on we'll sell the land, or I hear he's about to pass over. All these terms are euphemisms for dying, although the verb pass alone as well as pass away have been used in the sense of "pass out of existence, die" since the 1300s. The two variants-adding on [c. 1800] and over [c. 1900]-allude to moving to some other-worldly realm.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I think we use "passed away" more than "pass over" see this from the freedictionary.com :
    pass away
    Also, pass on or over . Die, as in He passed away last week, or After Grandma passes on we'll sell the land, or I hear he's about to pass over. All these terms are euphemisms for dying, although the verb pass alone as well as pass away have been used in the sense of "pass out of existence, die" since the 1300s. The two variants-adding on [c. 1800] and over [c. 1900]-allude to moving to some other-worldly realm.
    Playfair then seemed to use this term loosely, since Joe had already died, and Playfair stressed the fact at the beginning of the ritual: (the) cremation

    Thank you!
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    As pob14 said, this is a phrase used (only) by people who believe in communication with a spirit world. As I understand it, they believe that a spirit can take some time to complete the transition to the spirit world, so it's not necessarily at the moment of death.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The meaning should be clear from the context. It's an exorcism. The spirit being exorcised is in the wrong place - in the world of the living as a poltergeist. It's not properly dead. The urn spilling is caused by the spirit's departure to the place where it belongs - the spirit world. It's a successful exorcism. *

    Yes, it's a phrasal verb, since "over" is not functioning with its normal meaning. The car passed over the bridge - normal meaning of "over" - not a phrasal verb. The spirit passed over - over what? - over nothing - phrasal verb with a complete meaning that cannot be understood from the ordinary meaning of the words.
    intr. fig. To die. Associated esp. with Spiritualism
    as the OED puts it.

    * PS I do not believe all that guff, but I understand what is meant by it.

    PPS
    I couldn't find "pass over" as an intransitive verb.
    Try this dictionary, Vic pass over - definition of pass over in English | Oxford Dictionaries
     
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