"pass the chance" and "pass up the chance"

jasmine12

Member
Japanese
I am doing an exercise for the TOEFL test.I came across the question I cannot understand.

[script]
Woman: Did you hear that Dr. Ward is goingto be the new college president?
Man: That’s not what I heard. I heard he passed up the chance.
Narrator: What has the man heard?

(A) That Dr. Ward passed the chance to the president.
(B) That Dr. Ward may not become the new college president.
(C) That Dr. Ward is the college’s past president.
(D) That Dr. Ward passed the president of the college in the hall.

The answer is supposed to be B, which I understand. But I cannot understand why A is incorrect. Isn’t “pass the chance” the same as “pass up the chance”?
 
  • DocPenfro

    Senior Member
    English - British
    No. "Pass up" is a phrasal verb, and you should not assume that its meaning is the same as "pass". If you "pass up" an opportunity, you are declining to accept it. Answer (B) is correct. You cannot pass a chance.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Jasmin12,

    I would have gone for B until I read the question and answers carefully. I then decided that no answer was correct.
    B should probably read, "That Dr. Ward will not be(come) the new college president."

    GF..

    Are you sure you have copied the original question correctly?
     

    jasmine12

    Member
    Japanese
    Doc,
    Are you saying that there is no such an expression as "pass a/ the chance"? The word "up" should always follow "pass"?

    George
    Yes, it is from Mackmillan Language House.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Doc,
    Are you saying that there is no such an expression as "pass a/ the chance"? The word "up" should always follow "pass"?

    George
    Yes, it is from Mackmillan Language House.

    fdenture,
    So, do you also agree with Doc? The word "up" should always have to come after "pass"?
    In this context, it is in a phrasal verb so you must use up. In other uses, pass can mean other things and does not require the word up.
     

    Giorgia X

    Member
    Italian
    Jasmin12,

    I would have gone for B until I read the question and answers carefully. I then decided that no answer was correct.
    B should probably read, "That Dr. Ward will not be(come) the new college president."

    GF..


    Are you sure you have copied the original question correctly?
    I tend to agree with George. If one passes up the chance to become the new college president, you wouldn't say " he may not become the college president" but he won't become...It makes more sense.Therefore,in my opinion, answer B isn't correct
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I tend to agree with George. If one passes up the chance to become the new college president, you wouldn't say " he may not become the college president" but he won't become..
    Perhaps it's polite tentativeness. After all, it's what he heard from a source that might or might not be reliable, rather than from the horse's mouth.
     

    Giorgia X

    Member
    Italian
    Yes,indeed. Now,that I've been through the text in question one more time, I've come to realize that Dr Ward passing up the chance to become the new college president,might have been only a rumour. Thanks natkrep. [...]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
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