pass this round as I'm talking and take a little look at it

VicNicSor

Senior Member
Russian
pass around
If a group of people pass something around or pass it round, they each take it and then give it to the next person.
Just pass this round as I'm talking and take a little look at it...
Collins cobuild

The event sequence seems strange to me. Why is it not " Just take a little look at it and pass this round as I'm talking ..." ?
Thank you.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "And" doesn't always mean "then". He is talking to all the people, not just the first person. The individual people cannot take a look at it before the passing around starts. Yours might actually be stranger. :)
     

    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Do you mean "Just pass this round" means "just start passing this round"? That is, after passing round starts, each person looks at "this" and passes it to another ?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Basically. If someone tells you to "Pat your head and rub your tummy.", they want to see you do both at the same time. Instructions to a group generally can't all be done at the same time. "Children, go to the toilet before we leave." doesn't mean that all nine children must use the toilet together.
     

    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Basically. If someone tells you to "Pat your head and rub your tummy.", they want to see you do both at the same time. Instructions to a group generally can't all be done at the same time. "Children, go to the toilet before we leave." doesn't mean that all nine children must use the toilet together.
    Of course:D

    I just thought that "pass this round (...) and take a little look at it" meant something like: "each of you should pass it to another and (then) look at it".

    Thank you.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I understand this as plural pass but singular take:

    (You lot) just pass this round as I'm talking and (each of you) take a little look at it (as it comes round).

    As I see it, taking a look is a "subcommand" to passing it round, so it only makes proper sense when mentioned second.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    That distinction isn't made by many people I know, Parla (including me). It's essentially BrE, but "round" and "around" are used pretty interchangeably (when referring to physical movement or location): Drive around the block or Drive round the block. Sometimes "round" even sounds more natural to me than "around": Come round to my house. It's explained quite well here (at the end).

    Cross-posted with Vik.

    Ws:)
     

    soleilady

    New Member
    English - US
    If nothing else, the instructor may have rephrased as: "Pass this (a)round and take a look while I'm talking." The "take a look", in that particular order, could potentially incite a separate action from the first ("passing it around"), although naturally that's not the intention.
     

    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    If nothing else, the instructor may have rephrased as: "Pass this (a)round and take a look while I'm talking." The "take a look", in that particular order, could potentially incite a separate action from the first ("passing it around"), although naturally that's not the intention.
    Do you mean there is a difference if we shift "while I'm talking"?
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    VikNikSor, your question reminds me of a TV commercial.

    It is an ad for a promotion to encourage people to lease cars. They want to tell you how easy it is to lease the car -- you only have to sign the agreement and the car is yours. They call it the "Sign and Drive" event. Then they show people trying to drive the cars and sign the papers at the same time. Of course they are running into things. They say "Maybe we should change the name to "Sign then Drive."

    This is meant to be a joke. Of course it is funny because while "sign and drive" literally means sign and drive at the same time, no one would understand it to mean this. Everyone would know what is meant.

    Your sentence, "Pass this round and take a look," is the same thing. If you think hard about it it literally means to look at it while you're handing it to the next person. But everyone would understand what you mean to say.
     

    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    VikNikSor, your question reminds me of a TV commercial.

    It is an ad for a promotion to encourage people to lease cars. They want to tell you how easy it is to lease the car -- you only have to sign the agreement and the car is yours. They call it the "Sign and Drive" event. Then they show people trying to drive the cars and sign the papers at the same time. Of course they are running into things. They say "Maybe we should change the name to "Sign then Drive."

    This is meant to be a joke. Of course it is funny because while "sign and drive" literally means sign and drive at the same time, no one would understand it to mean this. Everyone would know what is meant.

    Your sentence, "Pass this round and take a look," is the same thing. If you think hard about it it literally means to look at it while you're handing it to the next person. But everyone would understand what you mean to say.
    I don't know, maybe somewhere in this thread I was unclear, but I never understood this as two actions happening at the same time, literally. I don't know why you and Myridon (in #4) took my words this way:)
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    And does not imply "at the same time", and it does not imply "first one thing and then the other". It just means "and". "Do x and do y" means do both, and it does not imply anything about the order. Any information about order or coincidence has to come from context, either from other words in the sentence or from a natural relationship between x and y, not from the word and.

    "Don't drink and drive" is used to mean not to (attempt to) drive under the influence of alcohol (regardless of whether you can "handle" a certain amount), not necessarily not to drive while drinking something, and not necessarily not to drive after drinking something.

    "Black and white" is used to mean something like "all right or all wrong" or to refer to something with no color but shades of gray. It does not say white follows black, or that white and black necessarily occur together.
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I don't know why you and Myridon (in #4) took my words this way:)
    Actually, I understood from your original post that you thought that it did mean "pass it then look at it" as your original post suggest that the order should be different: "look at it then pass it".
    It is two actions happening at the same time for the whole group. In reality, the first thing that will happen is the first person will look at it, then he will pass it to the second person, then the second person will look at it, etc.
     
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