passare al telefono

cartaplus

Senior Member
italian
Ciao a tutti!
Come direste in Inglese ad un vostro interlocutore al telefono:
"Ti passo mia madre!".
Un grosso grazie a tutti!
 
  • TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    cartaplus said:
    Ciao a tutti!
    Come direste in Inglese ad un vostro interlocutore al telefono:
    "Ti passo mia madre!".
    Un grosso grazie a tutti!
    Please talk to my mom.
    Let me give you to my mom.
    Here's mom.
    Here's my mom.
    Let me let you talk to my mom.
    I'm going to pass you to my mom.

    ...e tanti altri esempi.
     

    ladybird

    Senior Member
    English, England
    TimLA said:
    Please talk to my mom.
    Let me give you to my mom.
    Here's mom.
    Here's my mom.
    Let me let you talk to my mom.
    I'm going to pass you to my mom.

    ...e tanti altri esempi.
    Ciao a tutti

    Hmm. I often say "I'll pass you on to.."

    Is this just some really appalling grammar on my part, or does anybody else use this in BE?

    ladybird
     

    Isapaola

    Senior Member
    Italian Italy
    Salve a tutti!
    Quindi il mio strausato I'll put you through to my mother è completamente out o solo datato come me?
     

    Sil313

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Isapaola said:
    Salve a tutti!
    Quindi il mio strausato I'll put you through to my mother è completamente out o solo datato come me?
    Anch'io usavo qsta espressione! E' vecchia? nn si usa???

    Sil313 said:
    Anch'io usavo qsta espressione! E' vecchia? nn si usa???
    Ho capito...

    Maybe "put the phone through to..." =ti passo la telefonata (for example in the office)

    "ti passo la mamma" means that you give the telephone to him (who wants to speak to my mum

    Is it righ?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    moodywop

    Banned
    Italian - Italy
    Isapaola said:
    Salve a tutti!
    Quindi il mio strausato I'll put you through to my mother è completamente out o solo datato come me?
    Aspettiamo i madrelingua. Tuttavia, per quanto ne so, "put through to" lo direbbe una centralinista:

    - Fitch & Co, good morning! How can I help you?
    - I'd like to speak to the sales manager
    - Just a minute. I'll put you through to the sales department

    "Ti passo x" non si può rendere con "I'll put him on"?
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    I'll put him on works, too. :thumbsup: There are lots of ways to say it. Tim mentioned a good number. If it's a call at home and I don't know or care who the person is, I'll just say "Let me get X (for you)." If I'm at work, however, I'll say something somewhat more formal, like "Let me pass/hand you over to X" or "Let me put you on with X" or "Let me put X on." The most formal ways are reserved for office secretaries (which I am not), who say things like "Let me connect you to X" and "Please wait while I put you through to X."

    What's kind of interesting is that in English we can say two seemingly opposite things to say the same thing here:

    Let me give you to my mom = Let me give you my mom
    I'm going to put you on with my mom = I'm going to put my mom on

    I suppose in Italian you wouldn't say Ti passo mia mamma = A mia mamma passo te or Ti passo a mia mamma, right?


    Brian
     

    moodywop

    Banned
    Italian - Italy
    I would only say ti passo mia madre (= passo mia madre a te - beware, though, this is only a grammatical analysis. I would never use the extended version). Maybe others also use ti passo a mia madre. Let's find out.

    With mamma usage varies: in some regions it's mia mamma, in others la mia mamma, in others, I guess, both are used.
     

    fox71

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Passami John!
    HAND ME OVER JOHN!
    PASS ME ON TO JOHN!

    Are either of them correct?
    Grazie per la risposta! CIAO
     

    giacinta

    Senior Member
    English
    One often hears "pass on" to mean that someone has died!

    I would always say (if the person is nearby) " I'll put on X" or (better) "I'll put X on" or "I'll hand you over to X".
    In an office situation, where the person (being called) is on another extension it is usual to say " I'll put you through to X" but never "I'll pass X to you". The person calling is being "put through" to the person he/she is calling, not the reverse. At least this the Australian experience. The Italian method is quite the opposite.

    I hope I have been clear!

    Giacinta



    Giacinta
     

    giacinta

    Senior Member
    English
    Sorry Corleone, but you would only say "I'll put you through to my mom" if she had access to another "cornetta" in another room and you were able to transfer the call. Otherwise you would simply say "here's mom- I'll put her on" and hand her the cornetta!

    Giacinta
     

    corleone

    Member
    italy
    Sorry Corleone, but you would only say "I'll put you through to my mom" if she had access to another "cornetta" in another room and you were able to transfer the call. Otherwise you would simply say "here's mom- I'll put her on" and hand her the cornetta!

    Giacinta
    oh ok ...but there might be a specific context first and replies later..i didn't grasp wut she meant..that's why i replied that way
     

    diussi

    Senior Member
    italian
    Come si dice "mi passi XX per piacere?" quando si parla al telefono?
    "Ora devo andare, ti passo mamma che ti vuole salutare"
    "I have to go now, I'll .... mum who wants to say hi"
    Ho qualche problemino..:(
    GRAZIE IN ANTICIPO!
     

    andre_bobo32

    Member
    Italy
    Ciao a tutti,
    Immaginate di essere al telefono e dovete passare la telefonata e quindi la persona che sta parlando con voi ad un'altra persona, come si può dire in Inglese " te la/lo passo subito "

    GRAZIE A TUTTI!!!
     

    Ely79

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    If I understood well, we have to say:

    (at the office)
    - I'll put you through to Mr/Ms....
    - Let me put you on with Mr/Ms...

    is this correct?

    thank you
     

    Ely79

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Thank you! :)

    The prepositions in your suggestions are easier for Italian people, in respect to the ones above, because with "collegare" we also use "con"=with, and with "trasferire" we also use "a" (even if those verbs in Italian are not used if we have to "passare una telefonata a qualcuno") ;)
     

    giacinta

    Senior Member
    English
    It seems to me the main problem for English speakers is that in Italy the person with whom you wish to speak is "passed to you" whereas in English speaking countries you ask " to be passed to "the person with whom you wish to speak. Once this is mastered it is not so difficult!
    So we say " could you please put me through to Mr X?"
    In Italy they say " mi passa Signor Bianchi?" and the response " Glielo passo" ( "i pass him to you")
    Giacinta
     

    RickyITA

    New Member
    Italian
    Ciao a tutti, riporto un esempio:

    "Passami John!
    HAND ME OVER TO JOHN!
    PASS ME ON TO JOHN! "OVER" è più solito di "ON"


    Se dico "I'll hand you over to Mr X" o "I'll pass you over to Mr.X"

    Questi due casi si usano quando la persona che dobbiamo passare è vicina a noi senza che vi sia alcuna extension, giusto? Si passa la stessa cornetta che si sta usando?
    Sono formal o informal?

    Grazie mille!
     

    RickyITA

    New Member
    Italian
    Ciao a tutti, riporto un esempio:

    "Passami John!
    HAND ME OVER TO JOHN!
    PASS ME ON TO JOHN! "OVER" è più solito di "ON"


    Se dico "I'll hand you over to Mr X" o "I'll pass you over to Mr.X"

    Questi due casi si usano quando la persona che dobbiamo passare è vicina a noi senza che vi sia alcuna extension, giusto? Si passa la stessa cornetta che si sta usando?
    Sono formal o informal?

    Grazie mille!
    Nessuno che sappia rispondere?
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Is it wrong to say "Please, hold on for Mr Jones" for "Le passo il signor Jones"?
    I say this most of the times but I'm now suspecting I've always been wrong, as nobody mentioned this throughout the thread...
    Yes, you can say that, Mr Chip. :) (I'm pleased to note that you also included a 'please', something you neglected to do the other day when asking someone to hold for Mr Parker ;)) When I worked as a telephonist (aka :warning:"switch bitch":warning:), just after Noah came out of the ark, I used to abbreviate that to, Please hold for Mr Jones. :)
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    "Passami John!
    HAND ME OVER TO JOHN!
    PASS ME ON TO JOHN!
    "OVER" è più solito di "ON"
    Se dico "I'll hand you over to Mr X" o "I'll pass you over to Mr.X"
    Pass me to John! (no "on" or "over")
    Let me speak to John!
    Hand the phone to John!
    Get John on the phone!
    Not sure about "Hand me over to John!" It's not wrong, just not sure in what context I'd say this.
     

    sorry66

    Senior Member
    English, England
    HAND ME OVER TO JOHN!
    PASS ME ON TO JOHN!
    I think rrose corrections in post #34 sum it up nicely.
    Both of these make me think that the speaker is being held like a baby and he would rather be in the arms of John! Yet I don't think that with 'Pass me to John'!
    It's not what I would say, but you hear it a fair amount here.
    Really? Isn't it just a kind of joke? - 'I'll hand you over to John!' - and not that frequent.

    'Put John on the phone' is another option.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Really? Isn't it just a kind of joke? - 'I'll hand you over to John!' - and not that frequent.
    We're an unsophisticated lot down here (what do expect from a bunch of descendants of convicts?!!! :D)

    Hand me over to John!
    He handed me over to the supervisor who sorted the problem out in no time.
    I handed him over to Susan and thought, "She can deal with it!".
     
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