passer à côté de quelqu'un

HelpThanks

Member
french
Bsr - je cherche la traduction "bien-américaine" de passer à côté de quelqu'un ("je n'ai pas fait suffisamment attention à elle/lui ; je suis PASSEE A COTE d'elle/de lui - ((je ne l'ai pas apprécié (e) à sa juste valeur)) Merci !
 
  • la vie est belle

    Member
    English - American
    Hmmm... perhaps "to take someone for granted"

    Definition: "to expect someone or something to be always available to serve in some way without thanks or recognition; to value someone or something too lightly."

    Dans le contexte d'une relation quelqu'un "takes their partner for granted" quand, par exemple, l'homme croit aveuglement que sa femme ne le quitterais jamais. Donc, il ne la pas appréciée à sa juste valeur et il ne lui pas fait suffisamment d'attention. Elle en a marre de "being taken for granted," et du coup elle le quitte.

    Cette expression insiste surtout sur un manque de l’appréciation car on ne se rend pas compte du valeur de quelque chose jusqu'au moment où ce n'est plus là. L'expression ne s'applique qu'aux personnes... mais aussi les choses et les conditions.

    Ex.
    "Don't take your wealth for granted, one day you may lose it all."
     
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    jann

    co-mod'
    English - USA
    Actually, the sense is not so much that you take someone for granted as that you don't even notice the person.

    Passer à côté de quelqu'un = to overlook someone (standard), to pass someone over (a bit old-fashioned)

    With a full sentence for context, we could perhaps suggest some other translations that are more phrasal.

    (Translations for "to take someone for granted" have been discussed here.)
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    Salut HelpThanks, et bienvenue sur le forum :)

    Le sens n'est pas le même que "take someone for granted", mais il y aurait peut-être : To let someone slip through one's/your fingers ?
    Comme dans ces exemples :
    Don't let someone slip through your fingers because you were too afraid to tell them how you felt…

    Did you let someone slip through your fingers who could have brought something new to your life?
    Edit : je n'avais pas lu la réponse de jann. J'ai compris la phrase un peu comme « rater une belle aventure ».
    Si je remplaçais quelqu'un par quelque chose, je dirais : To miss / fail to seize an opportunity / To let a great opportunity pass you by.
     
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    HelpThanks

    Member
    french
    Thank .. you very much - you there gave me quite-two senses - i keep the both ! . I think here french language uses as "usual" an expression, pnly built some years/centuries before, as all "living" languages do ! Thanks again !

    Salut HelpThanks, et bienvenue sur le forum :)

    Le sens n'est pas le même que "take someone for granted", mais il y aurait peut-être : To let someone slip through one's/your fingers ?
    Comme dans ces exemples : Edit : je n'avais pas lu la réponse de jann. J'ai compris la phrase un peu comme « rater une belle aventure ».
    Si je remplaçais quelqu'un par quelque chose, je dirais : To miss / fail to seize an opportunity / To let a great opportunity pass you by.
    Thank you very much for the welcoming ! Good ?afternoon? (evening, for me !) ! I think i'd prefer your SECOND sentence ("Did you let someone slip through your fingers ..."). It really initially was the meaning of "i didn't give him/her the attention he/she desserved ; now, "je suis passé à côté de lui/d'elle". I keep ALL what you ALL gave me here ! - "My" first meaning in fact was : "not to enough appreciate somebody when there", so : i can pick up some thingssssss from everything you all sent (and will, maybe !). This thanks goes to Nicomon .. bec. i must go & work, but : T.H.A.N.K.S to everybody hre, and : At Your Service back (french language is ... not so easy !!!). Bye, for now ! Thanks again !


    Actually, the sense is not so much that you take someone for granted as that you don't even notice the person.

    Passer à côté de quelqu'un = to overlook someone (standard), to pass someone over (a bit old-fashioned)

    With a full sentence for context, we could perhaps suggest some other translations that are more phrasal.

    (Translations for "to take someone for granted" have been discussed here.)

    In fact, the context could be "i had "in front of, beside me" that person, and i didn't give him/her the attention he/she desserved. I didn't pay attention to him/her, now, "je suis passé à côté de lui/d'elle" ... Does that sounds better, as an explanation ? T.H.A.N.K you very much too !

    Thank you too - i'll go on that( Discussion later (here's 4 pm !). But i can check my expression was not ssssssooooo easy to be translated, as my american friends here in Paris'd told me !!!
     
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    HelpThanks

    Member
    french
    SORRY to once again "disturb" you with this (same) matter, but it seems my demand is not so-easy to be fulfilled, and it's important for me .. Here it is : do you think, 1), quote " to pass someone over" may be good for translating "passer à côté (de quelqu'un)" ((cette personne a vécu dans mon Immeuble, près de dix ans, sans que je lui parle ; je serai passé à côté d'elle (sans connaître les richesses intellectuelles qu'elle pouvait m'apporter, ses besoins, etc)), and 2) If convenient, do AMERICANS people, here, find it's a too-old fashioned expression ?
    Sorry again and again, and Thanks.
    (NO emergency)
    PS : i can detail in french if you want - i am French !
     

    gardian

    Banned
    English - Ireland
    No.

    Pass over signifie que vous avez choisi la compagnie d'un autre en préférence de cette personne-là.

    Pass by signifie que vous avez passé cette personne depuis des années sans plus qu'une salutation minimale.

    Je crois que pass by serait plus approprié pour votre contexte.
     

    jann

    co-mod'
    English - USA
    In normal American English, you would just say that you had "never noticed" this person. You could also say that you overlooked him, but that would be less common.

    We could easily say that a manager "overlooked" one of his subordinates at work... but we don't use "overlook" as often for personal things. "To pass someone over" is used in American English... but as I said before, it's a bit old-fashioned. "To pass by someone" in American English means that on a certain, specific, one-time occasion, you passed near the person without seeing/looking at him. That is not the meaning you want because you are talking about a period of several years. "To pass someone by" is essentially equivalent to "to pass someone over" to my ear... and as I said, I would not use it.
     

    HelpThanks

    Member
    french
    Thank you VERY MUCH to all of you - EACH of you gave me a special-light on that expression - i finish thinking it's a quite-special one for french language .. where we are the best for cutting one hair in four pieces, from its top to its bottom (i mean : vertically !) - as people here say ! Thanks again !
     
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