passive formats of all infinitives

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jalaluddin

Senior Member
India - Hindi & English
Imperative

love = be loved


Non-Finites


Present Infinitive

to love = to be loved


Continuous Infinitive

to be loving = to be being loved


Perfect Infinitive

to have loved = to have been loved

Perfect Participle

having love = having been loved


Present Participle

loving = being loved




Here, Conjugation of the verb LOVE is given in Active and Passive. I got
this formats from grammar book which is written by an English author. But,
some other bookks do not agree with this formats. I just want to get confirmed by you whether they are right or wrong in grammar terms.
 
  • brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    I agree with James. We usually use the normal passive infinitive, or we have to express this paraphrastically with a phrase like "in the process of." Perhaps a better verb than love could show this:

    - John is being treated by a world-renowned doctor.
    - John is lucky to be being treated by a world-renowned doctor. :cross:
    - John is lucky to be treated / that he is being treated by a world-renowned doctor. :tick:

    - Mary is being driven downtown.
    - Mary is happy to be being driven downtown. :cross:
    - Mary is happy to be in the process of being driven downtown. :tick:
    (even if kind of a mouthful)

    The use of "to be in the process of" stresses the continuousness of the action, as opposed to, say, the completion of the action.
     

    jalaluddin

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi & English
    Dear Experts,

    Thanks for taking interest. I got one sentence from english learning site that is about, continuous infinitive. Would you please check it ?


    (1) At 8pm tonight, John is going to be washing the dishes.

    (2) At 8pm tonight, the dishes are going to be being washed by John.




    Dear Seniors, I am eager to know and learn the right form. Your valuable experience and knowledge will drive me towards right direction.
     

    Basil Ganglia

    Senior Member
    English - USA

    - Mary is being driven downtown.
    - Mary is happy to be being driven downtown. :cross:
    - Mary is happy to be in the process of being driven downtown. :tick:
    (even if kind of a mouthful)
    I would normally express this as "Mary is happy that she is being driven downtown."

    The same type of sytnax will work to avoid most, if not all, of those very awkward "be/been + being" constructions. "Mary is happy that she is being/ has been loved."
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Yes, that would correspond to my John is being treated... example. I just wanted to show that in the process of is a common way of expressing a continuous action, and it can also be employed with the infinitive (unlike the gerund being): to be in the process of being...

    I just couldn't come up with a great example.

    jalaluddin said:
    (1) At 8pm tonight, John is going to be washing the dishes. :tick:

    (2) At 8pm tonight, the dishes are going to be being washed by John. :cross:
    I think to be being is always wrong.
     

    johndot

    Senior Member
    English - England
    (2) At 8pm tonight, the dishes are going to be being washed by John.
    This is a perfectly legitimate, and logical, format, as far as I can see: The future continuous passive. Written with less dramatic emphasis it could be shown like this:

    (2) At 8p m tonight, the dishes / are going to be / being washed / by John.

    That is only the equivalent of saying, “At 8 p.m the dishes are going to be in the process of being washed by whomever.”
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I don't think that it is actually incorrect as far as grammar is concerned and I have heard such constructions (and have probably spoken them), but I would avoid it if there is another way to say or write it. It's awkward.

    Here are some real-life examples. I find them all to be awkward:

    http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2008/01/28/615669.aspx
    Well, I do understand the economy, and I'm not going to be being any vice president to John McCain, either.

    http://kvetchuns.blogspot.com/2006/09/im-going-to-be-man-what-is-meaning-of.html
    This isn't half as hard as it is going to be being a man.

    http://www.medialifemagazine.com/news2001/nov01/nov05/1_mon/news5monday.html
    I think the greatest pull is going to be being able to go inside venues and areas where no other traditional forms of advertising exist and where everybody is going to be during the day, like the Las Vegas Convention Center.

    "...going to be being able to go..." takes the cake, in my opinion. :)
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Well, actually, the 2nd and 3rd sentences are fine because it's a different construction. It's actually <future, "going"> + <infinitive, "to be"> + <noun/gerund, "being">, and not <future, "going"> + <infinitive, "to be being">. That might not make sense, so let's look at it like this:

    I want to be being a man. :cross: <-- "to be being" acts as its own infinitive, ungrammatical

    Being a man is difficult. :tick: <-- "being" acts as a gerund, and "being a man" is taken together as a noun phrase

    Therefore:

    It is difficult being a man. :tick:
    It will be difficult being a man. :tick:
    It is going to be difficult being a man. :tick:
    This is more difficult than it is going to be being a man. :tick:


    As you can see, <being a man> is taken together as a noun phrase, separately from <going to be>, which is really a verb phrase meaning "will be."
     

    jalaluddin

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi & English
    "to be in the process of being washed"

    "to be being washed" - Whoever wrote this format fromwhere I found, He must have left -in the process- out to join the form. I suppose, This format can be used for actions; not for situations, such as sleeping, being a good person, being a shy.

    As you have mentioned, "Being a man". To indicate the situations you mentioned the better idea rather than using continuous infinitive.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with those who have said that "to be being + past participle" is perfectly grammatical. This is one of those constructions that looks funny written down, but is - I think - pretty common in speech.

    That said, I agree JamesM's first example is not particularly edifying. The second and third ones are different, as Brian has said, because 'being' is a noun - a gerund - rather than a participle: they seem OK to me (sorry, James:().

    I really hope this post will be being read by WRF-visitors in ten years' time.

    I suspect it won't.
     
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