passive of verb to call

Huda

Senior Member
arabic-Egypt
Please help me.
Can we use verb to call in the passive voice?
For example, "Being irresponsive, she was called by most people who expressed themselves boldly stolid."
Thanks in advance.
 
  • I would need information since I don't yet understand your sentence. Yes, "call" can be put in the passive voice, it is done routinely. However, do you mean call as "contacted via email/telephone or other means", or do you mean call as "named as?" These are two different verbs.

    Can you give more details of what you want to say?
     

    Winstanley808

    Banned
    English - U.S.
    Huda, I think you mean

    Because she was unresponsive, most people who expressed themselves called her "boldly stolid."

    That would, in fact, be the better way to put it unless you are required as part of an exercise to use the passive voice. If you must do that or fail the exam, you can still make the sentence clearer by rearranging it:

    Being irresponsive, she was called "boldly stolid" by most people who expressed themselves.

    I have put "boldly stolid" in quotation marks because it is an unusual combination, perhaps even an oxymoron (a word or phrase in which the two parts contradict each other, like "passive-aggressive"; "boldness" would usually implies aggressiveness or activity, while "stolidity" usually requires reserve or inactivity). When such a new combination is created, we usually put it in quotation marks to point out its novelty and make it clear that it is not a mistake.

    And if neither of my sentences expresses what you really have in mind, then I can't help you either until you rewrite the original.

    And Mr. Texas is correct, the verb "to call" has a passive form, "to be called," for, as far as I can think, all senses of the verb.
     

    Huda

    Senior Member
    arabic-Egypt
    Huda, I think you mean

    Being irresponsive, she was called "boldly stolid" by most people who expressed themselves.

    I have put "boldly stolid" in quotation marks because it is an unusual combination, perhaps even an oxymoron (a word or phrase in which the two parts contradict each other, like "passive-aggressive"; "boldness" would usually implies aggressiveness or activity, while "stolidity" usually requires reserve or inactivity). When such a new combination is created, we usually put it in quotation marks to point out its novelty and make it clear that it is not a mistake.
    Thank you so much. The adverb "boldly" qualifies "expressed" not "stolid" It seems that there is a problem in my sentence. sorry for causing you any confusion.

    I would need information since I don't yet understand your sentence. Yes, "call" can be put in the passive voice, it is done routinely. However, do you mean call as "contacted via email/telephone or other means", or do you mean call as "named as?" These are two different verbs.

    Can you give more details of what you want to say?
    I meant call as "named as" Thank you
     

    cando

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Given your clarification, the sentence could be written as:

    Being unresponsive, she was called "stolid" by most people who expressed themselves boldly.

    You could also rewrite your sentence as follows:

    Because she was unresponsive, those who expressed themselves boldly mostly called her "stolid".

    Further rewrites with alternative vocabulary is also possible, but I don't want to depart too much from your original words.
     
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