Passive past participles

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panettonea

Senior Member
English--US
In a Greek book of mine, it states: "[Although] a learned form restricted in usage, [passive past] participles are sometimes used in newspapers and in more formal discourse...." Then it gives these two examples:

(1) Για να εξασφαλίσει την απόδοση των εξαγγελθέντων μέτρων...

(2) Τα μη εισπραχθέντα χρέη του δημοσίου...

Unfortunately, those aren't complete sentences. When these participles are used, is the main verb typically in the simple past? Also, is the action denoted by this kind of participle considered to have been completed before that of the main verb?

Could anyone provide more examples (preferably complete sentences) of the use of the passive past participle as well, or a Web page (in English) that delves into the matter? Thanks for any help. Incidentally, the book also says that of the 5 kinds of participles that exist in modern Greek, only 3 types are in common use, and this ain't one of 'em. ;)
 
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  • ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Hi

    First let's deal with the main verb. It can be whichever tense it wants :D. You see the passive past participle's tense refers only to when the action described by participle happened. The information the tense of the participle gives us, in and by itself is only related to it also: it's an act that is finished, done.

    So we can have these following cases:

    Ο δικηγόρος έφυγε χωρίς να παραδώσει τα υπεσχεθέντα έγγραφα. (Both actions in the past, the main verb happens before the ppp)
    Ο δικηγόρος αυτή τη στιγμή παραδίδει τα υπεσχεθέντα έγγραφα (Main verb in the present, the documents still promised in the past :) )
    Ο δικηγόρος θα υπογράψει τα υπεσχεθέντα έγγραφα (Main verb in the future)

    Some google examples for διαγραφείς (note that only the first one in this page are for the particle), διαγραφείσα, διαγραφέν.
     

    panettonea

    Senior Member
    English--US
    Hi

    First let's deal with the main verb. It can be whichever tense it wants :D. You see the passive past participle's tense refers only to when the action described by participle happened. The information the tense of the participle gives us, in and by itself is only related to it also: it's an act that is finished, done.
    Thanks, ireney. That definitely clarifies matters.

    Ο δικηγόρος έφυγε χωρίς να παραδώσει τα υπεσχεθέντα έγγραφα. (Both actions in the past, the main verb happens before the ppp)
    Ο δικηγόρος αυτή τη στιγμή παραδίδει τα υπεσχεθέντα έγγραφα (Main verb in the present, the documents still promised in the past :) )
    Ο δικηγόρος θα υπογράψει τα υπεσχεθέντα έγγραφα (Main verb in the future)

    Some google examples for διαγραφείς (note that only the first one in this page are for the particle), διαγραφείσα, διαγραφέν.
    Thanks--your examples are helpful.
     

    panettonea

    Senior Member
    English--US
    Ο δικηγόρος έφυγε χωρίς να παραδώσει τα υπεσχεθέντα έγγραφα. (Both actions in the past, the main verb happens before the ppp)
    I was thinking about this sentence a little more. It seems to me that the action of the main verb happens after that of the participle. If the documents had been promised, that promise was obviously made before the lawyer left. If the promise was made after he left, that would make no sense. :)

    So, in each of the 3 examples you provided, the action of the ppp occurred before that of the main verb. Can anyone think of another example in which the action of the verb precedes that of the ppp?
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Whoops true. Well, I can't come up with one with this particular example but how about this:
    Ο κύριος Χ, διαγραφείς από το κόμμα το 2002, είχε πει το 1999 ότι .....
     

    panettonea

    Senior Member
    English--US
    Whoops true. Well, I can't come up with one with this particular example but how about this:
    Ο κύριος Χ, διαγραφείς από το κόμμα το 2002, είχε πει το 1999 ότι .....
    OK, that works--thanks. :)
     
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