passive without to be verb

marwajami

Member
Persian
→A gold ring with a diamond set into it.
→Mission accomplished.
→An alarm button set into the wall beside the door
Why are some passive sentences constructed without "Be" like the above sentences?
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    In 1 'set into it' is a past participle phrase acting adjectivally. You can see it as a shortened version of 'that is set into it'.

    2 is a concise message. It's a shortened version of 'The mission is accomplished'.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    →a gold ring with a diamond set into it. = a gold ring with a diamond [that has been] set into it [by someone].
    Set into it is a reduced relative clause modifying "diamond."

    →Mission accomplished. = [The] mission [has been] accomplished [by someone].

    Mission accomplished is simply a shortened form.

    The principle is the same: if a native speaker will add the words himself, then they are not needed.

    (Slow crosspost.)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    None of those examples is a finite verb construction in the passive voice. “Mission accomplished” is as Paul explains above. The other two are adjectival expressions describing a particular object. It doesn’t even make much sense to rationalise them as passive.

    Which gold ring?
    The one [that has] a diamond set into it. :thumbsup: (active)
    The one [that has had] a diamond set into it. :thumbsdown: (passive)

    Which alarm button?
    The one [that is] set into the wall beside the door. :thumbsup: (active)
    The one [that has been] set into the wall beside the door. :thumbsdown: (passive)
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Past participles are often used as adjectives. Compare:
    • A gold ring with a diamond set into it.
    • A gold ring with a diamond inlaid in it.
    • A gold ring with a diamond in it.
    They all mean the same. I don't think you need waste energy with these supposed "extended" versions, unless you can't grasp the concept otherwise. They will never cross the mind of a native speaker.
     
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