Passport

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PocketWatch

Member
USA English
I have located a passport of my grandfather's from the early 1920s and was wondering if someoen could give me a hand in translating it. The first side is what is written on the back. I would GREATLY appreciate this, thank you very much in advance. I have uploaded them and posted pictures of them here since I would not be very good at typing Polish. By the way I have reason to believe that some of this might be in Czech since he left Europe from Prague but I noticed the Polish accent marks in words (unless these used to be used in the Czech language). So here they are:

First side:
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p181/EdwardDocumentary/port1.jpg

Second side:
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p181/EdwardDocumentary/port2.jpg

Third side:
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p181/EdwardDocumentary/port3.jpg
 
  • Piotr_WRF

    Senior Member
    Polish, German
    This is not a passport but a certificate of passing a test and a seminar in medicine at the University of Lwów (now L'viv, a city in western Ukraine). It's in Polish, no part is written in Czech.

    The first scan (the back) is written by a notary that says that the copy is identical with the original. The two other scans look more like the original than a copy to me, though.

    Maybe I'll post a complete translation later when I find some time.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    My attempts:
    First:
    For the compliance of this copy with the indicated to me ?????? stamped original.
    In L'viv, on the sixth of December, Anno Domini nineteen twenty one.

    Second:
    Certificate
    Mr Ignacy Morgenstern a listener* of medicine department attended in the winter semester in the academic year 1920/21, the lecture titled Descriptive Anatomy of the Human Body, Osteology, Syndesmology and Splanchology(?) (... hours...) and coming today to the Colloquium passed them; excellent mark.

    In L'viv on the 25th of Nov, 1920.
    Third:
    The certificate of attendance at the Chemical-Bacteriological Seminar (Labolatory).
    It is herby confirmed that Mr Ignacy Morgenstern -- a listener* of the Medicine Department at ???? L'viv University over the winter semester in the academic year 1920/1921 attended the tutorials in chemical-bacteriological Seminar (Labolatory) and took an active part in them in urine analisis.

    General detailed dietetic and the range of Bacteriology with Prof Dr of medicine W. Nowicki.

    General result: good.

    In L'viv on the 8th of Dec, 1920.



    *Not sure but I think it's not existent in Anglo-Saxon countries, słuchacz is not a student so that's why I gavre literal translation here.
    In some places--????-- I couldn't make out the words/abbrevations, perhaps someone else will help.


    Tom
     

    Piotr_WRF

    Senior Member
    Polish, German
    Third:
    The certificate of attendance at the Chemical-Bacteriological Seminar (Labolatory).
    It is herby confirmed that Mr Ignacy Morgenstern -- a listener* of the Medicine Department at ???? L'viv University over the winter semester in the academic year 1920/1921 attended the tutorials in chemical-bacteriological Seminar (Labolatory) and took an active part in them in urine analisis.
    *Not sure but I think it's not existent in Anglo-Saxon countries, słuchacz is not a student so that's why I gavre literal translation here.
    In some places--????-- I couldn't make out the words/abbrevations, perhaps someone else will help.
    In the certificate it's written "słuchacz zwyczajny" (lit. "regular listener") which I think nowadays simply means "student".

    The abbreviation "c.k." before "Uniwersytet Lwowski" means "cesarsko-królewski" (imperial-royal). It's a leftover from the times before WW I when Lwów was under Austrian government. On the stamps you can see the name of the university that was given after Poland gained independence: "Uniwersytet Jana Kazimierza we Lwowie", named after Jan Kazimierz, king of Poland, who founded it in 1661.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    In the certificate it's written "słuchacz zwyczajny" (lit. "regular listener") which I think nowadays simply means "student".
    Well, it still appears in a student's card. There are some differences between a słuchacz and student, generally the latter one has got more rights. I also deleted the translation of zwyczajny since I have never heard it used with this word. Anyway, the document was issued almost a century ago and it all could really be different then.


    Do you happen to decipher the last word in the second line of the first document?


    Tom
     

    Piotr_WRF

    Senior Member
    Polish, German
    I also deleted the translation of zwyczajny since I have never heard it used with this word. Anyway, the document was issued almost a century ago and it all could really be different then.
    It seems that in those times it was used quite often. There was a distinction between "słuchacz zwyczajny" and "słuchacz nadzwyczajny" (lit. "irregular listener"). The same distinction is made today for professors: "profesor zwyczajny" and "profesor nadzwyczajny" (assistant professor).
    A "słuchacz nadzwyczajny" didn't have to have a university-entrance diploma but he had fewer rights, e.g. he was not eligible for a state scholarship, he had to pay on a weekly basis for the lectures he attended etc.


    Do you happen to decipher the last word in the second line of the first document?
    No, this one gives me headaches, too. It seems to be an abbreviation because of the dot at the end.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    It looks as if it read:
    z wskazanym mi na 15....
    but then again there's a dot above the 1, and I'm not sure whether 15 is a number or ti is a part of the word?:confused:

    Tom
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    In that case I'd translate it as:
    For the compliance of this copy with the shown/indicated to me for 15 marks stamped original. (this is of course more literal translation).

    Tom
     

    vodevilja

    Member
    Poland, Polish/French
    To naprawdę jest "okazanym". Tam nie ma żadnego "s", to jest lekko rozlazłe "o". Porównaj z "ostemplowanym" - po prostu pierwszy haczyk litery nie złączył się z pętelką która łączy z następnym wyrazem.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Wiem, tyle, że wydaje mi się, że po angielsku może być i jedno i drugie. ;)

    Tom
     

    Spectre scolaire

    Senior Member
    Maltese and Russian
    Thomas1 said:
    Descriptive Anatomy of the Human Body, Osteology, Syndesmology, Myology and Splanchology(?)
    Osteology = study of bones, cf. Greek οστούν [ostún], in composite words (from a pre-vowel-blending): οστε(ο)- [osteo-].

    Syndesmology is a branch of anatomy which deals with the ‘ligaments’ of the human body, cf. Greek σύνδεσμος [sýndesmos], “ligament”, lit. “a binding together”.

    In linguistics, we have syndetic pronouns and relative clauses, and Ceasar’s famous ‘Veni, vidi, vici’ is an asyndeton (“not bound together [by conjunctions]”).

    Myology (forgotten in the translation) is the study of ‘muscles, cf. Greek μύς [mýs], (gen. μυός [myós]), “muscle“.

    Splanchnology is an obsolete medical term.

    In the original document, “splanchologia” is probably a printing error. I can’t see why Polish should not have adapted the Latin form of the word, ‘splanchnologia’, which in turn is transliteration from Greek.

    This part of the anatomy deals with the ‘viscera’, the Latin term denoting “the internal organs of the body”. The main part of ‘splanchno-logia’ is Greek σπλάγχνoν [splángchnon] which contains a nasal in the sequence γχ - not in the Medieval word σπλάχνoν [spláchnon] though.

    Splanchnology sounds almost funny today. It has been split into more specialized sections like the cardiovascular system, respiratory system, alimentary, urinary, reproductive and the endocrine systems. This old term goes way back to Hippocrates and Galen.
    :) :)
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Thanks, Spectre Scolaire, I wasn't sure about Splanchology and indeed didn't note Myology.:eek: Your explications are marvellous :)
    [...]In the original document, “splanchologia” is probably a printing error. I can’t see why Polish should not have adapted the Latin form of the word, ‘splanchnologia’, which in turn is transliteration from Greek.

    This part of the anatomy deals with the ‘viscera’, the Latin term denoting “the internal organs of the body”. The main part of ‘splanchno-logia’ is Greek σπλάγχνoν [splángchnon] which contains a nasal in the sequence γχ - not in the Medieval word σπλάχνoν [spláchnon] though.

    Splanchnology sounds almost funny today. It has been split into more specialized sections like the cardiovascular system, respiratory system, alimentary, urinary, reproductive and the endocrine systems. This old term goes way back to Hippocrates and Galen. [...]
    The document was issued almost a century ago, thus the name itself could well be functioning then and since medicine has been growing relatively fast the name has become probably out of usen today, or is it indeed so obsolete and reaches as far back as the times of Hippocrates?

    As for the spelling actually I was also about to point out it is a spelling mistake, but thought that at that time the spelling could differ. Anyway, today it is Splanchnologia. :)

    Tom
     
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