Past emphatic

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Isotta

Senior Member
English, Hodgepodge
Moderator's note:
This discussion was split off from the thread: Past simple over present perfect.
and is a reply to this post:
Do use the past simple in respect of events that are ongoing at the time of speaking?
Cagey, moderator

The term you're looking for is past emphatic, not "simple past," nor "past simple." Your initial post discussed the past emphatic, and now you've dragged in the past tense as well, which ought to seek refuge in a different thread, as it confuses the issue. And in that thread I might entertain discussing your other points.

Z.
 
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  • M56

    Banned
    Britain. English.
    Isotta said:
    The term you're looking for is past emphatic, not "simple past," nor "past simple." Your initial post discussed the past emphatic, and now you've dragged in the past tense as well, which ought to seek refuge in a different thread, as it confuses the issue. And in that thread I might entertain discussing your other points.

    Z.
    Ah, but then I'm an "English has only two tenses" man.
     

    Isotta

    Senior Member
    English, Hodgepodge
    Naturally! Another one of those claritas grammarians who has so aptly noted that English only has two modular or synthetic tenses: the present, as in, "I walk," and the past, "I walked." So helping verbs, being analytic, are out. Which leaves us...?

    Z.
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    Isotta said:
    The term you're looking for is past emphatic, not "simple past," nor "past simple." Your initial post discussed the past emphatic,
    Is there a "simple past" way to ask a question? Have you gone... is present perfect. Did you go... is past emphatic. Is there another alternative?

    Elisabetta, fascinated by what she's learning...
     

    M56

    Banned
    Britain. English.
    Isotta said:
    Naturally! Another one of those claritas grammarians who has so aptly noted that English only has two modular or synthetic tenses: the present, as in, "I walk," and the past, "I walked." So helping verbs, being analytic, are out. Which leaves us...?

    Z.
    Having to invent new terms? What's emphatic about "Did you see David?"
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    M56 said:
    Having to invent new terms? What's emphatic about "Did you see David?"
    I figured that because "I did see David" is past emphatic, as opposed to the simple past "I saw David", then "Did you see David?" must also be past emphatic. Hence, my question about whether there is a "simple" way to ask the question, as we certainly don't say "Saw you David?" :confused: But I'm a financial economist, not a grammarian. ;)

    Elisabetta
     

    Isotta

    Senior Member
    English, Hodgepodge
    Yes, the present emphatic is, "You do see David." Thus if you invert it into a question, it becomes, "Do you see David?" Likewise the past emphatic would be, "You did see David." If you invert it into a question, it becomes, "Did you see David?"

    For a question in the past tense, you can use voice intonation, "You saw David?"

    Z.
     

    M56

    Banned
    Britain. English.
    Isotta said:
    Yes, the present emphatic is, "You do see David." Thus if you invert it into a question, it becomes, "Do you see David?" Likewise the past emphatic would be, "You did see David." If you invert it into a question, it becomes, "Did you see David?"

    For a question in the past tense, you can use voice intonation, "You saw David?"

    Z.
    I disagree with your explanation.

    For a question in the past tense, you can use voice intonation, "You saw David?"
    That is a rising declarative question, and not a "pure" question.

    ...................
    "An emphasis marker is a word or affix that expresses a speaker's stress upon the predicate of a sentence."

    We have "Did you see David when you were in Paris?" (That is not marked for emphasis.)

    And: "Tell me right now young lady! Did you see David when you were in Paris?" (That is marked for emphasis)

    In the emphatic, "did" is used to mark stress, not time.

    Have a look at these:

    http://www.englishclub.com/grammar/verb-tenses_past_s.htm
    http://www.zozanga.com/unit/lesson31.htm
     
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