past tense of gardening term "to strike"

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Kayta

Member
English - Australia
Hi,

To strike a plant means to use a cutting of the stem etc to create a new plant. "I am going to strike those 10 roses today." But how do I refer to what I did yesterday.

"Yesterday I struck those 10 roses."
"Yesterday I striked those 10 roses."

Neither sounds right to me. Even "Yesterday I took strikings of those 10 roses." sounds wrong. Any ideas?
 
  • Driven

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    If you are talking to somebody who knows what about gardening and gardening terms, you can use "struck". However, "I struck those 10 roses" sounds like you hit them if you don't know gardening terminology. If you are talking to a general audience or a person not familiar with the terminology, then I would say, "I replanted 10 roses using cuttings from my rose bush" or something like that.
     

    Kayta

    Member
    English - Australia
    Replanted doesn't convey the same meaning. I could say that "I took a strike of each of those 10 roses yesterday" but that sounds clumsy. "Struck" definately sounds like I was attacking the rose bushes, even to other gardeners.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I must admit I don't know the term in a gardening sense at all - however, I would say that if the present tense usage is "to strike a rose" I see nothing wrong with "I struck a rose". If someone says "they struck a deal" we don't think of a deal being hit with a hammer because we are aware of the idiom.
     

    teksch

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Replanted doesn't convey the same meaning. I could say that "I took a strike of each of those 10 roses yesterday" but that sounds clumsy. "Struck" definately sounds like I was attacking the rose bushes, even to other gardeners.
    I suppose that you could say "I did strikes on each of those 10 roses yesterday." Is "strike" a common term or is it specific to your country? The only references I could find to it was from your home country.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    My mother is an avid rose gardener but I can't recall her talking much about striking roses. I know the term, but it hasn't turned up enough for me to be familiar with its actual use. The question is whether the gardening term is so divorced from the ordinary verb that you need to treat it as a derived formation and make it weak - rather like the question of whether the things we operate computers with are mouses. In practice the gardening term might not be common enough that even the users have clear intuitions about it. On balance I would go with 'struck' - I can't see any good reason why it isn't just the ordinary verb in one of its many senses.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    My mother is an avid rose gardener but I can't recall her talking much about striking roses. I know the term, but it hasn't turned up enough for me to be familiar with its actual use. The question is whether the gardening term is so divorced from the ordinary verb that you need to treat it as a derived formation and make it weak - rather like the question of whether the things we operate computers with are mouses. In practice the gardening term might not be common enough that even the users have clear intuitions about it. On balance I would go with 'struck' - I can't see any good reason why it isn't just the ordinary verb in one of its many senses.
    Yes, that's what I would think. If you say "I strike a rose" why on earth not "I struck a rose".
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I might point out we have a similar doubt with a more familiar use of the verb:

    The workers are going to strike for better pay.
    ? The workers struck for better pay.

    Here too I'm tempted to avoid the issue by saying 'went on strike'; but certainly *'striked' is impossible.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I know next to nothing about propagating roses, as you might expect of one preoccupied with hybridizing daylilies. The proposals to use struck seem to make very good sense from a linguistic point of view. Sadly, the gardeners don't seem to have approached the thorny topic in the same way.

    A web search provides this: Results 1 - 6 of 6 for "struck a rose"

    None of the six citations has anything to do with planting roses.


    I have no idea if the following is representative of rose gardeners in general. It sounds awful to me.

    I actually striked several roses in May this year (cool month) and they're growing rapidly.
    http://www.askmehelpdesk.com/gardening-plants/striking-roses-409289.html

    For what it may or may not be worth: Google Search: No results found for "striked a rose".
     
    Last edited:

    occlith

    Senior Member
    USA
    English - USA
    Kayta said:
    To strike a plant means to use a cutting of the stem etc to create a new plant.
    I have only heard the planting term strike to mean to root, not as a propagation technique.

    Strike - To send out or down (e.g., roots). Webster's II New College Dictionary

    Perhaps you could say instead,
    "Yesterday I made 10 rose cuttings"
    "Yesterday I made 10 stem cuttings for roses"?
     

    Kayta

    Member
    English - Australia
    Yes, it's used in the same way. Pieces of stem are dipped in honey and planted in soil to "strike" new roots.

    Thanks all, I think I prefer "yesterday I took strikings of those 10 roses." At least other gardeneres understood this when I used it although it started a whole discussion of the correct word. The debate raged for about 10 minutes until it was cut off abruptly by someone with "Well, I don't like roses anyway!"
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Dear me, not many gardeners around here - you should get outdoors more.

    In UK you don't strike roses, you strike cuttings. It's the 12th meaning of 'to strike' in the Concise Oxford English Dictionary

    12 insert (a cutting of a plant) in soil to take root. Ødevelop roots. Ø(of a young oyster) attach itself to a bed.
    Unusual to strike cuttings from roses since they are more normally grafted to a rootstock, but they can be propagated from cuttings so, in BE,
    "Yesterday I struck cuttings from those 10 roses".
     

    Driven

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    Dear me, not many gardeners around here - you should get outdoors more.

    In UK you don't strike roses, you strike cuttings. It's the 12th meaning of 'to strike' in the Concise Oxford English Dictionary

    Unusual to strike cuttings from roses since they are more normally grafted to a rootstock, but they can be propagated from cuttings so, in BE,
    "Yesterday I struck cuttings from those 10 roses".:tick:
    Sounds perfect!
     
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