Patán

csturt

Senior Member
English, US
So my girlfriend (native Spanish speaker) has started calling me (native English speaker) "Patán." What I want to know is, should I be worried?
 
  • Dlyons

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    So my girlfriend (native Spanish speaker) has started calling me (native English speaker) "Patán." What I want to know is, should I be worried?
    Yes. You may, or may not, wish to scroll down.































    Unrefined, countrified, awkward.
     

    duran3d

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    LOL. Well, its kind of an old word, not very used nowadays, so I guess she uses it as an affectionate nickname... depending on the way she says it. You can find it in literature from a couple centuries ago.

    Patán = bumpkin, brute person.
     

    Harmattan

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Patán = Hillybilly, redneck, countryboy, lacking breed... Just coming down from the hills.

    Spanish people is sometimes fond of giving a bit derogative names to their beloved ones as 'intimate names' (my piggywiggy and all that stuf). Maybe it's the same 'out there'? (The patán is like 'my rude boy'... ahem.)

    It depends on the tone, of course. Anyway, examine your behaviour... A bit too Simpsonesque, perhaps? Then, that's it.

    Quit mixing coke with the wine. That should help ;P
     

    csturt

    Senior Member
    English, US
    Sadly, none of those descriptions is exactly wrong. Let's hope she means it affectionately (LOL).
    Thanks for all yer help. see ya'll later.
     

    zpottage

    Member
    English, Australia
    In Australia we call this a bogan dont know what the american translation is ... ive heard on the simpsons yocal...?
     

    Idiomático

    Senior Member
    Latin American Spanish
    Most of the Spanish-speaking people With whom I come in contact (mostly from Latin America) know exactly what patán means and use it correctly. It does have a pejorative connotation.
     

    Fantasmagórico

    Senior Member
    Uruguayan Spanish
    Is your girlfriend from México? See this quote from a Mexican website:

    Muchas veces, cuando las mujeres están en la etapa del enamoramiento, es muy difícil darse cuentan que ese chico que tanto te gusta puede ser un patán disfrazado de un caballero…

    Un patán es un hombre zafio y ordinario: es decir, una persona grosera, sucia, descortés, desatento y sin educación…

    Pero para nosotras, un patán es aquel sujeto que siempre busca satisfacer sus necesidades sin importarle nada, es chantajista, calculador, egoísta, pero lo peor es que puede aparentar ser todo un caballero.
    http://www.todito.com/paginas/contenido/fc07122005/nt14915.html

    chantajista = blackmailer
    calculador = selfishly scheming?
    egoísta = egotist, selfish
     

    claudiadeplaya

    Member
    Mexico, Spanish
    I am Mexican and used that word yesterday, then came back here to see how I could explain to him what it means, In Mexico, we use derogatory terms as pet names as a joke, don't worry about being called a patán, it just means you are not acting like prince charming!

    I would compare it with unrefined, not gentelman like :)

    this thread was funny:)
     

    Na'ilah

    Senior Member
    USA English
    chantajista = blackmailer
    calculador = selfishly scheming? "CONNIVING," I think, is the word you are looking for.
    egoísta = egotist, selfish
    And, I agree with claudiadeplaya, patán is often used lightly, but again context is everything. My experience with the term also comes from México. Where is your girlfriend from and do you deserve to be called a redneck or a "brute" (i.e. giant a-hole, in my opinion)? These questions are for self-reflection, no need to answer.
     

    jsvillar

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Well, it's an old thread, but there is another possibility:

    Patán (Muttley) is the dog that goes with Pierre Nodoyuna (Dick Dastardly) in the double 0 car in Los Autos Locos (Wacky Races), an animated television series of Hanna-Barbera. In Spain, when somebody laughs as 'j, j, j, j' (please pronounce it as Spanish J) it is quite normal to make a reference to 'el perro Patán'.

    I'm almost sure this is not the answer to the original question, but since the title of the thread was 'Patán' I thought it was worth to make a reference.
     

    RushHourOfBabel

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    In Central America I found that patán when used as an adjective is the closest I could get to 'creepy', in teh sense of 'creepy man', hombre patán. Is this correct?

    Asqueroso didn't seem to capture the sexual side of being creepy, is there a word in Spanish that captures this idea?

    French appears to lack a good translation, which is why so many people here in Montreal include it in English, "je suis parti parce que j'ai trouvé les hommes la un peu creepy."
     

    Na'ilah

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In Central America I found that patán when used as an adjective is the closest I could get to 'creepy', in teh sense of 'creepy man', hombre patán. Is this correct?

    Asqueroso didn't seem to capture the sexual side of being creepy, is there a word in Spanish that captures this idea?

    French appears to lack a good translation, which is why so many people here in Montreal include it in English, "je suis parti parce que j'ai trouvé les hommes la un peu creepy."
    I don't know about Central America, but in Mexico:
    rabo verde--if the man in question is older
    me da cosa--which is less harsh than asqueroso. (neither always imply something sexual).

    Creepy doesn't necessarily have a sexual connotation either. It is the context that leads one to that conculsion. I have asked people to clarify what they mean by "creepy" on more than one occasion.

    I'd use asqueroso. Someone will ask for clarification if need be.
     
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