patronage of

blwings

Senior Member
Korean-S.Korea
"Let it stand with your favours whom profession of the same true religion towards God, and so great love hath united together in one, jointly to accept the protection and patronage of these my labours, which not their own worth hath encouraged, but your worthiness have enforced me to consecrate unto your Honours."

I normally use 'patronage of' in a sentence like "The event relies on the patronage of many supporters". Here, the people who offer the patronage are supporters. But in the above sentence, I got a feeling that 'my labours' are the things that get the patronage from someone. If I'm right, is there any rule to interpret 'patronage of' or you only have to depend on the context?
 
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  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Where is your sentence from? It is difficult to make sense of.

    I normally use 'patronage of' in a sentence like "The event relies on the patronages of many supporters". Here, the people who offer the patronages are supporters.
    This is the usual use, except that "patronage" is uncountable, so you should not write it in the plural.
     

    blwings

    Senior Member
    Korean-S.Korea
    Where is your sentence from? It is difficult to make sense of.


    This is the usual use, except that "patronage" is uncountable, so you should not write it in the plural.
    Thanks for pointing out that. I changed it into a singular form.
    And the source of the sentence is Thomas Potts' The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches in the Countie of Lancaster (1612). You can see the text here.
    Pott's Discovery of witches in the county of Lancaster : Potts, Thomas, fl. 1612-1618 : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Ah, the date accounts for the unusual language then. Don't try writing like this in modern English. :)

    The writer invites Thomas Lord Knyvet and Elizabeth his wife to accept the role of patrons to his book ("these my labours"; I imagine "these" refers to words, but if the book is a book of essays or similar, then "these" is probably each individual essay).

    The only way I can work out this meaning is by knowing that "patronage" can only refer to a person. Since the thing being given patronage is the writer's labours, the person doing the patronising has to be the person being addressed.
     

    blwings

    Senior Member
    Korean-S.Korea
    Ah, the date accounts for the unusual language then. Don't try writing like this in modern English. :)

    The writer invites Thomas Lord Knyvet and Elizabeth his wife to accept the role of patrons to his book ("these my labours"; I imagine "these" refers to words, but if the book is a book of essays or similar, then "these" is probably each individual essay).

    The only way I can work out this meaning is by knowing that "patronage" can only refer to a person. Since the thing being given patronage is the writer's labours, the person doing the patronising has to be the person being addressed.
    Thanks very much!
     
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