pecuniary

Whodunit

Senior Member
Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
Do you use "pecuniary" as a synonym for "financial"? Or is this word rather archaic or kind of speacial terminnolgy? It has Latin roots, as I know, but I wonder about the use. I have never heard or paid attention to it.

Thanks. :)
 
  • GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    It's certainly a more specialized term, but most educated readers would at least have a basic understanding of it. It's seen mostly in texts and articles related to economics and financial legal-ese.

    Edit: I realized one of the specicfic sources where this is heard most commonly is in the discussion of "pecuniary" damages after a large trial or court case. Any damages owed to the plaintiff by a defendant (if said plaintiff wins the case) are called "pecuniary," or more commonly, "monetary" damages.
     
    Charles Costante said:
    According to the Encarta dictionary these are the synonyms: monetary, financial, fiscal, economic, commercial, budgetary
    The young man of the house was involved with his vegetable garden, thinking of the pecuniary possibilities it held.

    = Young man tending his vegetables thought - I could earn a fortune flogging all these cabbages and caulliflowers, not to mention my bumper crop of nobby sprouts.' :D
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Pecuniary comes up often in transactional law.

    I don't know how many people would understand it, but you could say "I received a pecuniary gift from my boss this Christmas."
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I heard of an expression pecuniary advantage which means that someone has illigally gained money/financial benefit which puts them in a better position in relation to others.

    FWIW,
    Thomas
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Thomas1 said:
    I heard of an expression pecuniary advantage which means that someone has illigally gained money/financial benefit which puts them in a better position in relation to others.

    FWIW,
    Thomas
    The word pecuniary does not imply illegality.

    "monetary advantage", "pecuniary advantage" and "financial advantage" are pretty much interchangeable.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I suspect that these are the kind of synonym where each has its own nuance of meaning as well as some meanings in common with the others.

    Fiscal relates to public money, the treasury - then by extension to all matters financial.

    Pecuniary relates to actual money, specie, coin of the realm - then by extension to all matters financial.

    Economic relates to the broad considerations of societal wealth development and interaction in general - and by extension, to matters financial.

    Commercial relates to business, to trade and to trading - and by extension, to matters financial.

    Budgetary relates to estimating, forward provision, allocation and monitoring against targets - and by extension, to matters financial.

    Please note, these are not definitions, they are intuitions:D
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    At work today I had to complete a form about registration of interests. I work for the government and everyone above a certain grade of management has to fill in a form every year. This sets out where you live, which councillors you know, whether you, your partner or family have local property, links with companies that have dealings with the council. By influencing decisions around these you could potentialy gain pecuniary advantage and you have to declare an interest whenever this comes up.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Brioche said:
    The word pecuniary does not imply illegality.

    "monetary advantage", "pecuniary advantage" and "financial advantage" are pretty much interchangeable.
    In the first codified definition of British (=English and Welsh) law in the Theft Act of 1968, section 16 deals with pecuniary advantage by deception, and within meaning of this section, the expression pecuniary advantage comes across as gaining financial benefit through illegal actions unless I misunderstood its meaning. :)
    More on this here and here's a definition in Encarta.


    Brioche, of course the context would explain all, albeit in most situations, as you said, pecuniary advantage does not bear the connotations which I mentioned above.

    Sorry for not making myself clear from the very beginning.;)


    Regards,
    Thomas
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top