Peek out

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lzarzalejo73

Senior Member
Spanish
Hello everybody. I am writing about the Alhambra, in Spain, and I was wondering if I am using correctly the verb to peek out in the following sentence: "
"This creates a humid microclimate where plants from far more humid regions grow, at least on the mid and lower height of the hills. The trail peeks out the hillside onto the Alhambra". Thanks in advance for your kind cooperation.
 
  • lzarzalejo73

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Yes, I do, Uncle Jack. It would be a piece of writing with a heading such as: "THE TRAIL OF THE ALARIFE, AROUND THE ALHAMBRA" Maybe the previous paragraph would help you get a glimpse, a better understanding of what I am trying to convey. Thanks for your (previous) prompt answer.
     

    lzarzalejo73

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Sorry, Uncle Jack, I forgot to cut and paste it: "This path has now been equipped –on its first stretch- with some small retaining walls or steps, in order to hold the ground in place. As the path zigzags up the hill amongst dense riverfront vegetation, the scenery becomes a typical understory flora with shady spaces where hackberries, black bryonies, ivies and laurustinus grow in an unusual density thanks to the sprinkler irrigation –in its double function, that of irrigation and that of firefighting." "...This creates..."
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    No, your use of peeks out is wrong. "Peek out" can be used in two main ways. The first describes a person or animal looking at something from behind some form of cover. The second describes what this looks like to an observer. Here is someone peeking out from a window:

    The second meaning is also used metaphorically, for something that is mostly hidden, but is visible here and there. This could apply to a trail winding through vegetation, you could say it peeks out in places. However, for this to work, you need an external viewpoint, but you appear to be describing what you see from the path, not how the path is seen from somewhere else.

    What I think you might be trying to say is that you get glimpses of the Alhambra from the path, using the first meaning, but the trail has no eyes so it cannot peek in this sense. You could say that the trail offers peeks of the Alhambra, but I am not sure this is what you mean either. You certainly need "of" or "from" with "peeks out".
     
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