peerless advantage

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danielxu85

Senior Member
Mandarin Chinese
If I want to say the advantage is only exclusive to me , not my competitors, how could I say this in English? Is there any other problem with the following sentence?

Our almost peerless advantages in the overall investment climate will stand out from other regions.
 
  • Suehil

    Medemod
    British English
    No, not peerless. Peerless means 'unequalled'. 'Exclusive' would be better, but I'm afraid I don't entirely understand the sentence. Do you mean that the advantages will help you to stand out?
    What you are saying at the moment is that the advantages are regions that will stand out from other regions.
     

    danielxu85

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    Thanks, Suehil! I mean the advantages will help my region to stand out from other regions.

    How could I express this idea in clear and concise English?
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Daniel, try matchless, peculiar, special. Notice in your question is only exclusive to me, you don't need the only - it's contained in the exclusive. It's exclusive to me means that only I have it.
     

    danielxu85

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    Our almost unique/exclusive advantages in the overall investment climate will help our region stand out from other regions.
    This is my revised version according your suggestions.

    Any critique?
     

    Patapan

    Member
    UK English
    The 'almost' is a problem, because words like 'unique' and 'exclusive' have an absolute quality - ie you're either the only one with this advantage or you're not. 'Almost unique' is like 'nearly won'.

    If another competitor has the same advantage, you might be better advised to change the stress, eg 'Our advantages are almost unique', or try the word 'virtually' instead, eg 'Our virtually unique advantages...' Somehow that sounds less apologetic than 'almost' - but that may be just my opinion.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The investment opportunities unique to our region would be neater. All that stuff about investment climate gets in the way of direct communication, to my ear: do you really want to evoke pictures of the weather (climate)?
     

    danielxu85

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    Thanks, Thomas!
    Do you think "The investment opportunities unique to our region help our region stand out from other regions" has too many regions?

    I don't want to stick to investment climate. I think it is unEnglish! By investment climate, I mean "a well-developed infrastructure, a mature industrial chain, and government transparency and efficiency". Any better phrases than opportunities?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    We may have another pesky BE/AE difference here. Investment climate is perfectly clear in AE, and is distinct from investment opportunities. The former is composed of such things as an ample and educated workforce, reasonable tax rates, possible government investment incentives, decent property laws, etc. Investment opportunities exist within such a climate.

    Investment climate is one of those atrocities that have become common jargon for both business and for government, and it is both frequently used and easily understood, with no meteorological connotations.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    It is far more common in AE than in BE, but it is also no rarity in the latter:

    Results 1 - 10 of about 39,300 for "investment climate" site:.uk.

    It's a favorite of the World Bank, if that says anything not too damning. :rolleyes:
     

    danielxu85

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    I restructured the sentence like this: "The investment investment unique to our region help our region stand out from other regions" , but I think it has too many "region"s in it, How could I be not so repetitive?
     
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