peeved/annoyed

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  • nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    She have always peeved/annoyed me, so I don't know whether she was a mental to say the least.

    Please help me to choose the correct option.
    Hmm.....a mental:eek: That's a strong word for someone who's just been peeving/annoying you.......

    And, as usual, I (we) can use some context here......
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    She have always peeved/annoyed me, so I don't know whether she was a mental to say the least.

    Please help me to choose the correct option.
    Either "peeved" or "annoyed" is fine (once again, depending on context) but "She have" is wrong.

    And what is "a mental"?

    And tacking on "to say the least" at the end doesn't really work here.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    e.g. Suppose one girl, to whom I hate very much, asked me to love her quite often.

    Should I say (She have always peeved/annoyed me, so .............)?
    Hmmm....that's some context you have here:eek::D

    I'm thinking about something like:

    --She's always asking/buging me to.........(I'll leave the rest for your imagination:p)
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Gary, you can't have both "whether" and "to say the least". It's just too wordy and strange. Choose:

    She has always annoyed me. I don't know whether she is mental or not.
    She's been peeving me for quite some time now. She's mental, to say the least.

    And I might add that your example is sexist and unappropriate, to say the least. Do you know what mental means?
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    e.g. Suppose one girl, to whom I hate very much, asked me to love her quite often.

    Should I say (She have always peeved/annoyed me, so .............)?
    Peeved, annoyed, aggravated, frustrated, intimidated, etc. We have no way of providing a word because you haven't told us how seriously she annoyed you. Was she stalking you? Was she harrassing you? Was she just calling you up once a week to say hi? The subtleties in the English language are really quite complex, User_Gary, and we cannot usually answer in a "multiple choice" fashion.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    User, despite the grammar problems with your sentence if you are looking for correct both peeved and annoyed would be correct. However, in common American conversation usage you will seldom hear "peeved" and the word of choice would be "annoyed." Peeved is used more in written commuication. Where did you find the expression "mental?" It is an old slang expression meaning "a little bit crazy."
     

    Sarasaki

    Senior Member
    India - English & Kannada
    "Mental" is a typical indian-english way of calling someone "crazy". I do not see it being used as much these days. But I do remember using it in my childhood; way back many many years ago!!
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I think she's/he's (a bit) mental has also long been used in England mostly by those with little education, as a rather sloppy way of indicating insanity. (A person with a breathing problem is described in similar fashion as being a bit bronchial and sometimes with metathesis as a bit bronichal:cross:.
    I do not recall ever hearing or reading he/she peeved me i.e. peeve used as a transitive verb with an object, but only (and quite rarely) I'm (somewhat) peeved (about/by etc). Do any other native anglophones share this latter impression?
    To tidy up the language of the original sentence,
    She have always peeved/annoyed me, so I don't know whether she was a mental to say the least I would rephrase it in idiomatic English as:
    She always got on my nerves so much that I (tend to) think she must have been slightly/a bit nuts/barmy , to put it mildly. (I refrain from commenting on the logic or the political correctness of this statement).
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Gary, you can't have both "whether" and "to say the least". It's just too wordy and strange. Choose:

    She has always annoyed me. I don't know whether she is mental or not.
    She's been peeving me for quite some time now. She's mental, to say the least.

    And I might add that your example is sexist and unappropriate, to say the least. Do you know what mental means?
    In user_Gary's defence, I don't agree that the example is sexist or inappropriate. He happens to have used a female as the subject but it could just as easily be applied to a male. I can understand that some people may have a problem with describing someone as mental, but it's common enough in English to describe people as crazy, mad, insane or mental without intending to cause offence to those people unfortunate enough to be affected by genuine mental illness.
    I only hear peeve used in the sense of "I'm peeved" not somebody peeving me so I would say "She's always annoyed me, she's a bit loopy, to say the least."
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Thanks for the correction :D

    Maybe it's a non-native thing, but I don't recall ever hearing the word "mental" without its causing offence - not to the mentally disabled, but to the actual person the comment was about. Perhaps it wasn't sexist, but it was inappropriate.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Thanks for the correction :D

    Maybe it's a non-native thing, but I don't recall ever hearing the word "mental" without its causing offence - not to the mentally disabled, but to the actual person the comment was about. Perhaps it wasn't sexist, but it was inappropriate.
    I assumed that, as the person was perceived as being annoying, the comment was intended to be offensive towards her - a reaction to her apparently offensive behaviour. Whilst it may not be very forgiving or understanding, it may not be entirely inappropriate. It's really an exaggeration, the girl's behaviour is irrational and irrationality can be a symptom of mental illness.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Thanks for the correction :D

    Maybe it's a non-native thing, but I don't recall ever hearing the word "mental" without its causing offence - not to the mentally disabled, but to the actual person the comment was about. Perhaps it wasn't sexist, but it was inappropriate.
    You are quite right about mental, because in England, at least, to say someone is mental is a much greater insult than the synonyms mentioned, and refers to alleged mental illness rather than just stupidity. Even "you ought to have your head examined" is as nothing in comparison. Using mental like this is liable to start a fight, especially as it is much used in environments where violence is fairly common; the others will probably not have this result.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    You are quite right about mental, because in England, at least, to say someone is mental is a much greater insult than the synonyms mentioned, and refers to alleged mental illness rather than just stupidity. Even "you ought to have your head examined" is as nothing in comparison. Using mental like this is liable to start a fight, especially as it is much used in environments where violence is fairly common; the others will probably not have this result.
    I totally agree with that. At least that's my impression of the word.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    She have always peeved/annoyed me, so I don't know whether she was a mental to say the least.
    user_gary,

    I'm assuming she's still bothering you, so I offer this:

    1. Casual: She's always bothering me. I don't know why. Maybe she's mental or something.

    2. More appropriate: She's always bothering me. I don't know whether or not it's because she has some mental or emotional problems.

    3. Most polite: Her behavior is quite annoying. Perhaps it's because she's suffering from some mental problems.

    Personally, the use of the word, "mental" doesn't bother me. It's used in everyday, casual speech by young people, especially. Maybe it's not the most politically correct way to describe someone, but it gets the point across.

    I have more comments, but this isn't the CD Forum. :)


    AngelEyes
     
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