pending cases

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eno2

Senior Member
Dutch-Flemish
Hello,

Pending cases: what do they do in your language, pend, run, or stand, or something else?

In Dutch. Lopende zaken. Literally 'running cases'
But also 'hangende zaken'. Literally: 'hanging cases'. Which is 'pending'
So they both run and hang.
Or 'zaken in behandelng' Literally: in treatment.
 
  • Perseas

    Senior Member
    In Greek it is "εκκρεμείς υποθέσεις/περιπτώσεις"
    εκκρεμείς /ekre'mis/ , i.e. "pending".

    According to Wiktionary, ἐκκρεμής < ἐκκρεμάννυμι < ἐκ + κρεμμάνυμι (=hang, suspend).
    It says also that it is a semantic loan from the French "en suspens".

    If you used the participle "τρέχουσες (υποθέσεις)" <<τρέχουσες from verb τρέχω=run>>, that would mean "current cases".
     
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    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    τρέχουσες =>τρεχω is run,
    εκκρεμείς =>κρεμώ is hang. :)
    Yes I had found τρέχουσες υποθέσεις for Pending Cases. 'Current cases'is synonymous with 'pending cases', I think.
    <En suspens>, je ne sais pas, mois je dirais 'courantes', 'gérer les affaires courantes'. Je crois qu'on dit aussi: 'c'est un cas pendant'', comme en Anglais.
     
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    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French: les affaires en cours :tick: (so in the lexical field of run: courir, courant, en cours)
    "en suspens" means the treatment is suspended, while "en cours" means it is still in progress.

    c'est un cas pendant :cross:(no: this is an anglicism)

    "gérer les affaires courantes" is idiomatic and a bit different: it means manage the day-to-day operations / continue business as usual.
     
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    Perseas

    Senior Member
    In this case, "τρέχουσες υποθέσεις" is "affaires courrantes". "Εκκρεμείς υποθέσεις" refers to cases that are still undecided, unsettled (they may even remain pending since a long time). I'm not sure that "εκκρεμείς" matches "en suspens".
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    In French: les affaires en cours :tick: (so in the lexical field of run: courir, courant, en cours)
    "en suspens" means the treatment is suspended, while "en cours" means it is still in progress.
    :thumbsup:
    c'est un cas pendant :cross: (no: this is an anglicism)
    'Cas en cours' ne se dit pas. 'cas pendant' gets 4 times more used than 'affaire en cours', albeit an anglicism. Google Ngram Viewer
    "gérer les affaires courantes" is idiomatic and a bit different: it means manage the day-to-day operations / continue business as usual.
    Absolutely. It's literally our Dutch 'de lopende zaken besturen' Besturen= gérer. But we use 'lopende zaken' also for 'cases running', as I said in the O.P. 'Il y a beaucoup d'affaires courantes' should be 'il y a beaucoup d'affaires en cours'.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    In this case, "τρέχουσες υποθέσεις" is "affaires courrantes". "Εκκρεμείς υποθέσεις" refers to cases that are still undecided, unsettled (they may even remain pending since a long time). I'm not sure that "εκκρεμείς" matches "en suspens".
    En suspens, no, I don't think so.
    Εκκρεμείς υποθέσεις" is literally 'hangende zaken' in Dutch, and that doesn't mean either 'en suspens' but 'pending cases.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    'cas pendant' gets 4 times more used than 'affaire en cours', albeit an anglicism. Google Ngram Viewer
    Searching for "cas pendant" in Google returns things like:
    Dans tous les cas, pendant votre arrêt maladie...
    ...ne travaille en aucun cas pendant plus de six heures ...
    et, dans certains cas, pendant votre stage en entreprise...


    So nothing to do with "pending case"...
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Could be, but I don't know If Ngram works that way (haciendo caso omiso de la absencia de la coma). It shouldn't....that would be very disappointing, but with Google, one never knows...
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Spanish:

    asunto pendiente ("hanging issue"). It means you still haven't dealt with this issue. If you're attentive for new changes, you can also say a la espera "at the wait", but I think you should explicit what exactly are you waiting for: estoy pendiente / a la espera de los resultados. On the other hand en curso (curso comes from cursus, Latin past participle of currere "to run") means it's an ongoing procedure. Finally en suspenso means the procedure has been aborted for the moment and will be retaken somewhere in the future. Corriente (present participle of correr "to run") means "ordinary" in Spanish: normal y corriente.
     
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