people ages/aged 18 or older

  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    You are right, it is probably a typo, the two letters are next to each other and often get switched in my own typing!
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thanks. I asked this question because I frequently come across people writing "ages" instead of "aged" in similar sentences. I think it's acceptable in AmE to write "ages"?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Thanks. I asked this question because I frequently come across people writing "ages" instead of "aged" in similar sentences. I think it's acceptable in AmE to write "ages"?
    I have never noticed it, perhaps a native US person will come in and comment.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Or a native Aussie!
    I wonder what the contexts are for the uses? It seems to be a recent phenomenon, so in my eyes it would still be "wrong" as language changes always go through a lengthy phase of being wrong until they are universally accepted.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The US NIH page linked by EdisonBhola contains repeated examples of the usage 'people ages 18 or over' or similar: it can hardly be a typo.

    It is quite wrong in my opinion.
    There are two easy and obvious correct alternatives: 'people aged 18 or over' and 'people of ages 18 and over'.
    Thus there is no benefit to be gained from the ungrammatical usage.

    The Ngram linked by JordyBro is not directly relevant, because it only shows the phrase 'ages 18 or over'. That phrase in itself is not the real issue.

    It is putting together the two nouns 'people ages', with no preposition such as 'of', which is the grammatical error.

    It is comparable to saying 'people cars' instead of 'people with cars'.
     
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