People on bikes must wear a helmet.

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felicity.zyy

Member
Chinese
Hi!
People on bikes must wear a helmet. Why isn't this sentence "People on bikes must wear helmets"? I mean, the front part of the sentence is in the plural. Shouldn't we use the plural form in the latter part either?
 
  • felicity.zyy

    Member
    Chinese
    There are four possibilities for 'bike' and 'helmet'. Aside from both singular, this is not bad, in my opinion. "people ... wear helmets"-- double plural-- somehow reminds me of two heads.
    Thank you. If a mother has three children and she gives every child a present.(everyone has only a present) In this situation, should I say " The children are given a present" or "The children are given presents"?
     
    Thank you. If a mother has three children and she gives every child a present.(everyone has only a present) In this situation, should I say [1]" The children are given a present" or [2]"The children are given presents"?
    Yes, 1 might meam one present for all, BUT 2 does not say how many presents per child. If you mean 'one per', I'd suggest,
    [3]"The children are each given a present." or [4]"Each (and every) child gets a present" though in fact 4 does not exclude a child, or several, getting more than one.
     
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