Per i più golosi

sheryl.709

Senior Member
English-American
Hello everyone,
I wanted to add this to an old thread about "goloso", but unfortunately comments are closed.

I'm translating a recipe and came across this sentence:
Per i più golosi, che desiderano un risotto più cremoso, consigliamo di aggiungere...
My translation:
If you are a real foodie and prefer a creamier risotto, we recommend adding...

I think "foodie" has a positive connotation as the original Italian word, and better conveys the concept of someone who thoroughly enjoys food.
I just thought to add this thread, hope it's a help. :)
 
  • Benzene

    Senior Member
    Italian from Italy
    Hello sheryl.709!

    Yours is a good contribution and I agree with you about usage of noun "foodie".

    For completeness I add two words that could be suitable for the context of the OP, as follows:

    1. "gourmet" = "a connoisseur of good food; a person with a discerning palate" [source: Oxford Dictionary];
    2. "gourmand" = "a person who enjoys eating and often eats too much [source: Oxford Dictionary].
    Usage
    The words gourmand and gourmet overlap in meaning but are not identical. Both can be used to mean "a connoisseur of good food" but gourmand is more usually used to mean "a person who enjoys eating and often eats too much". [Source: Oxford Dictionary].

    Hope it's a help!:)

    Bye,
    Benzene
     
    Last edited:

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Per i più golosi, che desiderano un risotto più cremoso, consigliamo di aggiungere...
    My translation:
    If you are a real foodie and prefer a creamier risotto, we recommend adding...

    I think "foodie" has a positive connotation as the original Italian word, and better conveys the concept of someone who thoroughly enjoys food.
    Foodie has a positive connotaton but 'golosi' doesn't necessarily. For example, You could be 'goloso' of MacDonald's junk food which no real foodie would touch with a barge-pole.:)

    I think I'd be more inclined to say something along the lines of 'If you really appreciate delicious food...'.
     

    sheryl.709

    Senior Member
    English-American
    Hello sheryl.709!

    Yours is a good contribution and I agree with you about usage of noun "foodie".

    For completeness I add two words that could be suitable for the context of the OP, as follows:

    1. "gourmet" = "a connoisseur of good food; a person with a discerning palate" [source: Oxford Dictionary];
    2. "gourmand" = "a person who enjoys eating and often eats too much [source: Oxford Dictionary].
    Usage
    The words gourmand and gourmet overlap in meaning but are not identical. Both can be used to mean "a connoisseur of good food" but gourmand is more usually used to mean "a person who enjoys eating and often eats too much". [Source: Oxford Dictionary].

    Hope it's a help!:)

    Bye,
    Benzene
    Thanks Benzene, those are two other good options!
     

    sheryl.709

    Senior Member
    English-American
    Foodie has a positive connotaton but 'golosi' doesn't necessarily. For example, You could be 'goloso' of MacDonald's junk food which no real foodie would touch with a barge-pole.:) True...I guess I was thinking of this particular sentence. ;)

    I think I'd be more inclined to say something along the lines of 'If you really appreciate delicious food...'. That's also a good suggestion, though I was trying to find a one-word adjective :D But, thanks for your suggestion.
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I think the word "decadent" is often used in recipes, so something along the lines of
    For something (a little) more decadent, for those who like their risotto a little creamier, you can try adding...
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I think the word "decadent" is often used in recipes, so something along the lines of
    For something (a little) more decadent, for those who like their risotto a little creamier, you can try adding...
    Yes, I was thinking that the idea of "i più golosi" tends to attach to the food in English, not to the eater. Something like "If you like your risotto extra-creamy, add....".

    To my mind, "foodie" doesn't really capture the concept here: "a real foodie" would want the right kind of Italian short-grain rice, good parmigiano reggiano, home-made stock, etc., but I don't see any inherent connection between being "a real foodie" and wanting a creamier risotto, which is more a matter of personal taste.
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    To my mind, "foodie" doesn't really capture the concept here: "a real foodie" would want the right kind of Italian short-grain rice, good parmigiano reggiano, home-made stock, etc., but I don't see any inherent connection between being "a real foodie" and wanting a creamier risotto, which is more a matter of personal taste.
    I see your point, however I think that the author is taking for granted that a creamier risotto is better than a "standard" one so a foodie would definitely like it more.
     

    merse0

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    ... however I think that the author is taking for granted that a creamier risotto is better than a "standard" one.
    Non necessariamente, infatti li apprezza sono definiti "golosi". Certi risotti, se resi "troppo cremosi", non migliorano affatto.
    Da tutto ciò che ho letto, il suggerimento di Benzene, GOURMAND mi sembra il migliore.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Non necessariamente, infatti li apprezza sono definiti "golosi". Certi risotti, se resi "troppo cremosi", non migliorano affatto.
    Da tutto ciò che ho letto, il suggerimento di Benzene, GOURMAND mi sembra il migliore.
    Maybe it's just me, but my one problem with "gourmand" is that I don't feel it's a commonly used word. Much of my life revolves around food--cooking it, eating it, seeking it out, reading about it--and it's not a word I use, or tend to hear used. It feels kind of old-fashioned, and kind of judgmental, like a more polite way of calling someone a glutton and/or slighting them for being privileged enough to pay attention to what they eat. Given a choice between "gourmand" and "gourmet" as nouns for someone who likes good food, I'd probably go with "gourmet," although "gourmet" comes freighted with its own connotations of fanciness, expensiveness, exclusiveness, etc.

    There's a strong Puritan streak in Anglo culture that declares we're supposed to "eat to live, not live to eat," and that anyone who thinks about food beyond its basic nutritional purposes is to be regarded with suspicion. And even if a lot of English-speakers don't subscribe to this belief any more, it's still there in the language.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It isn't just you, arti. I never use the word 'gourmand'.:) My life also revolves round food and my son's a chef in London, because he was brought up 'revolving round food' (and drink) and has a very fine palate.:D

    I don't think 'gourmet' is the right word here either. A gourmet expects thing just so, done by the recipe or with great attention to detail in any case. A 'goloso' simply enjoys their food.
     

    merse0

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Cercando "goloso" sul nostro Dictionary, appaiono anche "gluttonous" e "gormandizer".
    Li escludete ambedue?
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Cercando "goloso" sul nostro Dictionary, appaiono anche "gluttonous" e "gormandizer".
    Li escludete ambedue?
    They're both extremely pejorative. I imagine "goloso" might be pejorative in some contexts, but it's certainly not in the context the OP is asking about, so neither would work.

    A 'goloso' simply enjoys their food.
    Given the lack of appropriate words in English, I often refer to myself simply as "someone who likes their food." :) Or, in this day and age when cooking is apparently a dying art, at least in North America, "I like to cook" can mean something similar.
     

    merse0

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    gormandizer n(glutton, greedy eater)goloso, ghiottone nm
    ingordo nm

    Cut & paste dal nostro dizionario.
    Forse va corretto?
     

    MoltoMahler

    Member
    Italian
    It perhaps depends on the context. "For the real trenchermen/ foodlovers out there/ For those who really like their food / like to pig themselves / like to indulge / don't count the calories.."
    "For those who don't count the calories", to which I'd also add something like "and are not afraid to go somewhere a little off the beaten track", is exactly what I get when I read that phrase. The way I see it, the author is saying that the original recipe calls for a specific level of creaminess, which affects not only the taste but also the appearance of the dish, but if one were willing to take some liberties they might get a tastier result, although a little heavier (hence the use of the word "golosi").
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Nope never heard it either. Sounds like a new kind of kitchen appliance. :D In any case I think gourmand or glutton for someone opting to add something to a recipe are not very good options here (it sounds over-the-top judgmental) and as stated above by a number of people a rewording is the best way around it.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top